Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/261171
Title:
Filtering the Effects of Competition from Ring-Width Series
Author:
Blasing, T. J.; Duvick, D. N.; Cook, E. R.
Affiliation:
Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, New York
Issue Date:
1983
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Bulletin
Citation:
Norton, D.A. 1983. Modern New Zealand tree-ring chronologies I: Nothofagus solandri. Tree-Ring Bulletin 43:1-17.
Abstract:
Spline functions were examined and compared with conventional polynomials for use in filtering nonclimatic variance from tree-ring width series. Both types of curve were fitted to ring-width series exhibiting particularly marked effects of competition and release from competition with neighboring trees during the last 100 years. Available climatic data from that interval were used to statistically evaluate the capabilities of each type of function for removing nonclimatic effects and preserving the climatic signal. The results suggest that both types of function can be used successfully for those purposes, though in the presence of extremely rapid changes in growth rate due to a sudden release from competition it may be necessary to divide the ring-width series into two segments and fit a separate curve to each segment. Tightly-fit polynomials seem to be about as effective as splines, but are less desirable from a computational point of view as, for example, when the magnitude of the (negative) exponents of the coefficients exceeds computer capacity. Further, a spline function can be prescribed from its frequency-response characteristics, so it is possible to specify in advance the extent to which it will filter out any potential climatic cycles.
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Broadleaves; Dendroclimatology; Trees; Woody Plants
ISSN:
0041-2198
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFiltering the Effects of Competition from Ring-Width Seriesen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlasing, T. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuvick, D. N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCook, E. R.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennesseeen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, New Yorken_US
dc.date.issued1983-
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Bulletinen_US
dc.identifier.citationNorton, D.A. 1983. Modern New Zealand tree-ring chronologies I: Nothofagus solandri. Tree-Ring Bulletin 43:1-17.en_US
dc.description.abstractSpline functions were examined and compared with conventional polynomials for use in filtering nonclimatic variance from tree-ring width series. Both types of curve were fitted to ring-width series exhibiting particularly marked effects of competition and release from competition with neighboring trees during the last 100 years. Available climatic data from that interval were used to statistically evaluate the capabilities of each type of function for removing nonclimatic effects and preserving the climatic signal. The results suggest that both types of function can be used successfully for those purposes, though in the presence of extremely rapid changes in growth rate due to a sudden release from competition it may be necessary to divide the ring-width series into two segments and fit a separate curve to each segment. Tightly-fit polynomials seem to be about as effective as splines, but are less desirable from a computational point of view as, for example, when the magnitude of the (negative) exponents of the coefficients exceeds computer capacity. Further, a spline function can be prescribed from its frequency-response characteristics, so it is possible to specify in advance the extent to which it will filter out any potential climatic cycles.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectBroadleavesen_US
dc.subjectDendroclimatologyen_US
dc.subjectTreesen_US
dc.subjectWoody Plantsen_US
dc.identifier.citationNorton, D.A. 1983. Modern New Zealand tree-ring chronologies I: Nothofagus solandri. Tree-Ring Bulletin 43:1-17.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0041-2198-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/261171-
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Bulletinen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
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