The Role of Social Capital in a Community Health Worker Model for Grassroots Advocacy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/255199
Title:
The Role of Social Capital in a Community Health Worker Model for Grassroots Advocacy
Author:
Jacobs, Laurel
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 28-Nov-2014
Abstract:
The social determinants of health continue to impact health disparities among communities living along the U.S.-Mexico border. Because community health workers (CHWs) are recognized for promoting a variety of positive patient-centered health outcomes in their roles as educators and health system navigators, recent inquiry has focused on the role of the CHW in facilitating community-level changes through grassroots advocacy to impact the social determinants of health. Social capital theory, which posits that participation in groups has positive consequences for individuals and the community, is a useful lens through which CHW effectiveness in grassroots advocacy can be measured and replicated. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, this study investigated the social capital characteristics of fifteen CHWs working in border communities who were trained in grassroots advocacy. Participating CHWs reported high baseline levels of social capital, which was assessed using a social capital questionnaire. After one year of engagement in grassroots advocacy, participating CHWs reported statistically significant increases in one measure of bridging social capital (community engagement) and one measure of linking social capita (participation with political/civic leaders). Qualitative interviews with each CHW further explored the role of social capital in their grassroots advocacy, resulting in a social capital model elucidating six activities of CHW-driven grassroots advocacy. The mixed methods results provide measures for assessing CHWs' social capital in their traditional roles and as grassroots advocates, as well as a framework for understanding how CHWs use their social capital to take grassroots action addressing the social determinants of health.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Grassroots Advocacy; Policy; Promotora; Social Capital; Public Health; Community Advocacy; Community Health Worker
Degree Name:
D.P.H.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Public Health
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schachter, Kenneth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Social Capital in a Community Health Worker Model for Grassroots Advocacyen_US
dc.creatorJacobs, Laurelen_US
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Laurelen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 28-Nov-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractThe social determinants of health continue to impact health disparities among communities living along the U.S.-Mexico border. Because community health workers (CHWs) are recognized for promoting a variety of positive patient-centered health outcomes in their roles as educators and health system navigators, recent inquiry has focused on the role of the CHW in facilitating community-level changes through grassroots advocacy to impact the social determinants of health. Social capital theory, which posits that participation in groups has positive consequences for individuals and the community, is a useful lens through which CHW effectiveness in grassroots advocacy can be measured and replicated. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, this study investigated the social capital characteristics of fifteen CHWs working in border communities who were trained in grassroots advocacy. Participating CHWs reported high baseline levels of social capital, which was assessed using a social capital questionnaire. After one year of engagement in grassroots advocacy, participating CHWs reported statistically significant increases in one measure of bridging social capital (community engagement) and one measure of linking social capita (participation with political/civic leaders). Qualitative interviews with each CHW further explored the role of social capital in their grassroots advocacy, resulting in a social capital model elucidating six activities of CHW-driven grassroots advocacy. The mixed methods results provide measures for assessing CHWs' social capital in their traditional roles and as grassroots advocates, as well as a framework for understanding how CHWs use their social capital to take grassroots action addressing the social determinants of health.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGrassroots Advocacyen_US
dc.subjectPolicyen_US
dc.subjectPromotoraen_US
dc.subjectSocial Capitalen_US
dc.subjectPublic Healthen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Advocacyen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Health Workeren_US
thesis.degree.nameD.P.H.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePublic Healthen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchachter, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEisenberg, Merrillen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarvajal, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMacKinnon, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchachter, Kennethen_US
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