Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/255198
Title:
Elucidating the Role of Lasp-2 in Cell Adhesion and Migration
Author:
Bliss, Katherine Theresa
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 20-May-2013
Abstract:
In order for cells to migrate, communicate, and facilitate attachment to the surrounding extraceullar matrix, they must form intricate protein complexes called focal adhesions. The number of identified focal adhesion components continues to grow and the field is an area of active study.Lasp-2 is a member of the nebulin family of actin-binding proteins that has been identified as a member of focal adhesion complexes. To gain further insights into the functional role of lasp-2, we identified two additional binding partners of lasp-2, the integral focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and paxillin. Interestingly, the interaction of lasp-2 with its binding partners vinculin and paxillin was significantly reduced in presence of lasp-1, another nebulin family member. The presence of lasp-2 appears to enhance the interaction of vinculin and paxillin with each other, however, as with the interaction of lasp-2 with vinculin or paxillin, this effect is greatly diminished in the presence of excess lasp-1 suggesting the interplay between lasp-2 and lasp-2 could be an adhesion regulatory mechanism. Lasp-2's potential role in metastasis was revealed as overexpression of lasp-2 in SW620 cells, a highly metastatic cancer cell line, increased cell migration, but impeded cell invasion.Lasp-2 transcript and protein is readily detected in neural tissues. Preliminary experiments involving the knockdown of lasp-2- in frog embryos revealed gross morphological abnormalities in the head region as well as the inability to move normally. Neural crest derived melanocytes also failed to migrate normally.Taken together, these data suggest that lasp-2 has an important role in coordinating and regulating the composition and dynamics of focal adhesions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cytoskeleton; Migration; Nebulin; Cell Biology & Anatomy; Actin; Adhesion
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Cell Biology & Anatomy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gregorio, Carol C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleElucidating the Role of Lasp-2 in Cell Adhesion and Migrationen_US
dc.creatorBliss, Katherine Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBliss, Katherine Theresaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 20-May-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractIn order for cells to migrate, communicate, and facilitate attachment to the surrounding extraceullar matrix, they must form intricate protein complexes called focal adhesions. The number of identified focal adhesion components continues to grow and the field is an area of active study.Lasp-2 is a member of the nebulin family of actin-binding proteins that has been identified as a member of focal adhesion complexes. To gain further insights into the functional role of lasp-2, we identified two additional binding partners of lasp-2, the integral focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and paxillin. Interestingly, the interaction of lasp-2 with its binding partners vinculin and paxillin was significantly reduced in presence of lasp-1, another nebulin family member. The presence of lasp-2 appears to enhance the interaction of vinculin and paxillin with each other, however, as with the interaction of lasp-2 with vinculin or paxillin, this effect is greatly diminished in the presence of excess lasp-1 suggesting the interplay between lasp-2 and lasp-2 could be an adhesion regulatory mechanism. Lasp-2's potential role in metastasis was revealed as overexpression of lasp-2 in SW620 cells, a highly metastatic cancer cell line, increased cell migration, but impeded cell invasion.Lasp-2 transcript and protein is readily detected in neural tissues. Preliminary experiments involving the knockdown of lasp-2- in frog embryos revealed gross morphological abnormalities in the head region as well as the inability to move normally. Neural crest derived melanocytes also failed to migrate normally.Taken together, these data suggest that lasp-2 has an important role in coordinating and regulating the composition and dynamics of focal adhesions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCytoskeletonen_US
dc.subjectMigrationen_US
dc.subjectNebulinen_US
dc.subjectCell Biology & Anatomyen_US
dc.subjectActinen_US
dc.subjectAdhesionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCell Biology & Anatomyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGregorio, Carol C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, Jean M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoetschman, Thomas C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGranzier, Henk L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGregorio, Carol C.en_US
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