Experimental and Analytical Studies of Geo-Composite Applications in Soil Reinforcement

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/255167
Title:
Experimental and Analytical Studies of Geo-Composite Applications in Soil Reinforcement
Author:
Toufigh, Vahab
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 27-Apr-2014
Abstract:
The main weakness of soil is its inability to resist tensile stresses. Civil engineers have been trying to address this problem for decades. To increase the tensile and shear strengths of soil, different methods of reinforcing such as using geosynthetics have been used in different types of earth structures such as retaining walls, earth dams, slopes, etc. Due to the excellent corrosion resistance of polymers, the use of geosynthetics has increased dramatically in recent years. However, there are some significant problems associated with geosynthetics, such as creep and low modulus of elasticity. In this research, a new Geo-Composite which is made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) is used to overcome some of the short comings of the existing geosynthetics. The new Geo-Composite has all the benefits of the geotextiles plus higher strength, higher modulus and no creep. In first part of the investigation, over eighty experiments were carried out using direct shear test. The interface properties of the Geo-Composite (CFRP) and fine sand were investigated. Tests showed that the interface shear behavior between Geo-Composite and fine sand depended on the normal forces during the curing of epoxy and curing age of epoxy. The two methods used to prepare the specimen are pre-casting and casting in place, and the results of these two methods are compared. In the second part of the investigation, the pull-out test device was designed and assembled using a triaxial loading device and a direct shear device. In the pull-out test, the normal force applied by the triaxial loading and pull out force is applied by a direct shear device. CFRP samples were prepared in the lab, and pre-cast and cast-in-place samples were tested using fine sand. The pull-out force and corresponding displacements of each of the materials were recorded and compared. In the third part of the investigation, the behavior of the interface between coarse sand and modified CFRP has been studied in larger scale using a device known as Cyclic Multi Degree of Freedom (CYMDOF) device. A constitutive Model, Hierachical Single Surface (HISS) model, is used to characterize the behavior of the interfaces. The constitutive model is verified by predicting the laboratory behavior of interface. In the forth part of the investigation, using the laboratory test data results, a finite element procedure with the hardening model is used to simulate field behavior of a CFRP reinforced earth retaining wall, and compare the results with a geotextile reinforced earth retaining wall. This section shows the advantages and disadvantages of using CFRP in MSE walls.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Geosynthetics; Interactions; Interfaces; Soil-structure; Civil Engineering; Constitutive Models; Fiber reinforced Polymer
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Saadatmanesh, Hamid

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExperimental and Analytical Studies of Geo-Composite Applications in Soil Reinforcementen_US
dc.creatorToufigh, Vahaben_US
dc.contributor.authorToufigh, Vahaben_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 27-Apr-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractThe main weakness of soil is its inability to resist tensile stresses. Civil engineers have been trying to address this problem for decades. To increase the tensile and shear strengths of soil, different methods of reinforcing such as using geosynthetics have been used in different types of earth structures such as retaining walls, earth dams, slopes, etc. Due to the excellent corrosion resistance of polymers, the use of geosynthetics has increased dramatically in recent years. However, there are some significant problems associated with geosynthetics, such as creep and low modulus of elasticity. In this research, a new Geo-Composite which is made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) is used to overcome some of the short comings of the existing geosynthetics. The new Geo-Composite has all the benefits of the geotextiles plus higher strength, higher modulus and no creep. In first part of the investigation, over eighty experiments were carried out using direct shear test. The interface properties of the Geo-Composite (CFRP) and fine sand were investigated. Tests showed that the interface shear behavior between Geo-Composite and fine sand depended on the normal forces during the curing of epoxy and curing age of epoxy. The two methods used to prepare the specimen are pre-casting and casting in place, and the results of these two methods are compared. In the second part of the investigation, the pull-out test device was designed and assembled using a triaxial loading device and a direct shear device. In the pull-out test, the normal force applied by the triaxial loading and pull out force is applied by a direct shear device. CFRP samples were prepared in the lab, and pre-cast and cast-in-place samples were tested using fine sand. The pull-out force and corresponding displacements of each of the materials were recorded and compared. In the third part of the investigation, the behavior of the interface between coarse sand and modified CFRP has been studied in larger scale using a device known as Cyclic Multi Degree of Freedom (CYMDOF) device. A constitutive Model, Hierachical Single Surface (HISS) model, is used to characterize the behavior of the interfaces. The constitutive model is verified by predicting the laboratory behavior of interface. In the forth part of the investigation, using the laboratory test data results, a finite element procedure with the hardening model is used to simulate field behavior of a CFRP reinforced earth retaining wall, and compare the results with a geotextile reinforced earth retaining wall. This section shows the advantages and disadvantages of using CFRP in MSE walls.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGeosyntheticsen_US
dc.subjectInteractionsen_US
dc.subjectInterfacesen_US
dc.subjectSoil-structureen_US
dc.subjectCivil Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectConstitutive Modelsen_US
dc.subjectFiber reinforced Polymeren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSaadatmanesh, Hamiden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKundu, Tribikramen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZhang, Lianyangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKemeny, John M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaadatmanesh, Hamiden_US
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