Second language reading in a hypermedia environment: The role of proficiency, annotation use, text format, and prior knowledge.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/252892
Title:
Second language reading in a hypermedia environment: The role of proficiency, annotation use, text format, and prior knowledge.
Author:
Ercetin, Naciye Gulcan
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation has two main goals. First, it explores the use of hypermedia annotations by intermediate and advanced ESL learners while reading a hypermedia text. Second, the study investigates the relationship between reading comprehension and several variables that are the focus of this study: annotation use, text format, and prior knowledge. The participants are 103 ESL adult learners enrolled at the Center for English as a Second Language at the University of Arizona. Data were collected in several ways. A tracking tool incorporated into the hypermedia program recorded every interaction of the reader with the text in terms of the frequency of access to a given annotation or the amount and time spent on a given annotation. Data also included scores from a reading comprehension test and a prior knowledge test, both of which were developed for this study, as well as data from interviews and a questionnaire. Results indicate that intermediate and advanced learners displayed different patterns of annotation use. The intermediate group accessed annotations more frequently than the advanced group. However, they did not spend more time on annotations. The relationship between annotation use and reading comprehension also differed based on the proficiency level. While annotation use did not explain reading comprehension for the advanced group, over-reliance on certain annotations had a negative impact on the intermediate group. The study did not find any effect of text format on reading comprehension. However, prior knowledge was found to be an important variable related to reading comprehension. Finally, the qualitative data reveal that hypermedia reading had a positive impact on the participants' attitude towards reading on the computer. Despite the lack of quantitative evidence for the significant contribution of annotation use on reading comprehension, the participants indicated that the provision of information using multiple forms of media made reading more enjoyable and comprehensible.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Adult and Continuing.; Education, Technology of.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ruiz, Richard; Ariew, Robert A.
Committee Chair:
Ruiz, Richard; Ariew, Robert A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSecond language reading in a hypermedia environment: The role of proficiency, annotation use, text format, and prior knowledge.en_US
dc.creatorErcetin, Naciye Gulcanen_US
dc.contributor.authorErcetin, Naciye Gulcanen_US
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation has two main goals. First, it explores the use of hypermedia annotations by intermediate and advanced ESL learners while reading a hypermedia text. Second, the study investigates the relationship between reading comprehension and several variables that are the focus of this study: annotation use, text format, and prior knowledge. The participants are 103 ESL adult learners enrolled at the Center for English as a Second Language at the University of Arizona. Data were collected in several ways. A tracking tool incorporated into the hypermedia program recorded every interaction of the reader with the text in terms of the frequency of access to a given annotation or the amount and time spent on a given annotation. Data also included scores from a reading comprehension test and a prior knowledge test, both of which were developed for this study, as well as data from interviews and a questionnaire. Results indicate that intermediate and advanced learners displayed different patterns of annotation use. The intermediate group accessed annotations more frequently than the advanced group. However, they did not spend more time on annotations. The relationship between annotation use and reading comprehension also differed based on the proficiency level. While annotation use did not explain reading comprehension for the advanced group, over-reliance on certain annotations had a negative impact on the intermediate group. The study did not find any effect of text format on reading comprehension. However, prior knowledge was found to be an important variable related to reading comprehension. Finally, the qualitative data reveal that hypermedia reading had a positive impact on the participants' attitude towards reading on the computer. Despite the lack of quantitative evidence for the significant contribution of annotation use on reading comprehension, the participants indicated that the provision of information using multiple forms of media made reading more enjoyable and comprehensible.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Adult and Continuing.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.advisorAriew, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.chairRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.chairAriew, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAriew, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberValmont, Williamen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016488-
dc.identifier.oclc58966520-
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