Married Korean women's responses to domestic violence within the framework of socio-cultural context

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/252853
Title:
Married Korean women's responses to domestic violence within the framework of socio-cultural context
Author:
Choi, Myunghan
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to test the psychometric properties of two newly developed instruments (the Korean Women's Abuse Screening Tool and the Korean Women's Abuse Intolerance Scale) and a theoretical model that predicts married Korean women's responses to domestic violence. Severity of abuse, Hwabyung, abuse intolerance, psychological relational power, and socio-structural power were examined in the model. The sample consisted of 184 married Korean women who were 20 years of age or older and self-identified as having been physically, psychologically, sexually, or financially abused by their husbands during their marriages. Subjects were recruited from one of three geographic locations (Seoul, Pusan, and Daejon, South Korea) and four different sites including a psychiatric clinic, shelters, home health care centers and the community. The construct validity of the KWAST and KWAIS was partially supported by R2 (.59) and the value of CFI (.967). Women's abuse intolerance (R2 = .86) was accounted for directly by abuse (r = .18, p < .01), Hwabyung (r = .09), and psychological relational power (r = .77, p < .01), and indirectly by psychological relational power through abuse (r = .62, p < .01), and Hwabyung (r = .07), indicating that younger women with higher levels of psychological relational power had higher levels of abuse intolerance.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Psychology, Clinical.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Phillips, Linda R.
Committee Chair:
Phillips, Linda R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMarried Korean women's responses to domestic violence within the framework of socio-cultural contexten_US
dc.creatorChoi, Myunghanen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Myunghanen_US
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to test the psychometric properties of two newly developed instruments (the Korean Women's Abuse Screening Tool and the Korean Women's Abuse Intolerance Scale) and a theoretical model that predicts married Korean women's responses to domestic violence. Severity of abuse, Hwabyung, abuse intolerance, psychological relational power, and socio-structural power were examined in the model. The sample consisted of 184 married Korean women who were 20 years of age or older and self-identified as having been physically, psychologically, sexually, or financially abused by their husbands during their marriages. Subjects were recruited from one of three geographic locations (Seoul, Pusan, and Daejon, South Korea) and four different sites including a psychiatric clinic, shelters, home health care centers and the community. The construct validity of the KWAST and KWAIS was partially supported by R2 (.59) and the value of CFI (.967). Women's abuse intolerance (R2 = .86) was accounted for directly by abuse (r = .18, p < .01), Hwabyung (r = .09), and psychological relational power (r = .77, p < .01), and indirectly by psychological relational power through abuse (r = .62, p < .01), and Hwabyung (r = .07), indicating that younger women with higher levels of psychological relational power had higher levels of abuse intolerance.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPhillips, Linda R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairPhillips, Linda R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhillips, Linda R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCromwell, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInsel, Kathleenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158076-
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