Korean ESL students' perceptions about themselves as readers and about reading in English

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/252833
Title:
Korean ESL students' perceptions about themselves as readers and about reading in English
Author:
Chin, Cheongsook
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study's primary purpose was to investigate Korean ESL students' perceptions about reading in English and about themselves as readers of English texts, and to examine how those perceptions influence their reading processing strategies. The secondary purpose was to discover how the cultural background of a text affects Korean ESL students' reading strategies and reading comprehension. Differences between intermediate and advanced readers were analyzed. The study followed a qualitative case study methodology, targeting five Korean ESL students in a university-affiliated language program. Five data sources were employed: interviews, questionnaires, think-aloud protocols, follow-up discussions, and a researcher's journal. Major findings were that (1) intermediate as well as advanced readers possessed the notion that second language reading, like first language, is an active process of comprehension; (2) subjects' perceptions about reading in English affected their interactions with English texts; (3) subjects employed a variety of reading strategies to enhance their comprehension; (4) both advanced and intermediate readers focused on meaning construction, but intermediate readers also indicated a strong concern with vocabulary, which became an obstacle to their reading comprehension; (5) participants perceived that it was easier to comprehend a culturally familiar text than a culturally unfamiliar one; and (6) regardless of proficiency, participants generally did not consider themselves good ESL readers, as they still have difficulty interacting with English texts. However, an analysis of their reading strategies demonstrated that all should be viewed as proficient ESL readers; they understood what they read, clarified their misunderstandings, and employed reading strategies appropriate to the given task. Implications of this study for teaching and for materials selection and design are provided.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Reading.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fox, Dana L.
Committee Chair:
Fox, Dana L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleKorean ESL students' perceptions about themselves as readers and about reading in Englishen_US
dc.creatorChin, Cheongsooken_US
dc.contributor.authorChin, Cheongsooken_US
dc.date.issued1996-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study's primary purpose was to investigate Korean ESL students' perceptions about reading in English and about themselves as readers of English texts, and to examine how those perceptions influence their reading processing strategies. The secondary purpose was to discover how the cultural background of a text affects Korean ESL students' reading strategies and reading comprehension. Differences between intermediate and advanced readers were analyzed. The study followed a qualitative case study methodology, targeting five Korean ESL students in a university-affiliated language program. Five data sources were employed: interviews, questionnaires, think-aloud protocols, follow-up discussions, and a researcher's journal. Major findings were that (1) intermediate as well as advanced readers possessed the notion that second language reading, like first language, is an active process of comprehension; (2) subjects' perceptions about reading in English affected their interactions with English texts; (3) subjects employed a variety of reading strategies to enhance their comprehension; (4) both advanced and intermediate readers focused on meaning construction, but intermediate readers also indicated a strong concern with vocabulary, which became an obstacle to their reading comprehension; (5) participants perceived that it was easier to comprehend a culturally familiar text than a culturally unfamiliar one; and (6) regardless of proficiency, participants generally did not consider themselves good ESL readers, as they still have difficulty interacting with English texts. However, an analysis of their reading strategies demonstrated that all should be viewed as proficient ESL readers; they understood what they read, clarified their misunderstandings, and employed reading strategies appropriate to the given task. Implications of this study for teaching and for materials selection and design are provided.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFox, Dana L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairFox, Dana L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yettaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberValmont, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFox, Danaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9713409-
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