The Development of a Moisture-Stressed Tree-Ring Chronology Network for the Southern Canadian Cordillera

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/251652
Title:
The Development of a Moisture-Stressed Tree-Ring Chronology Network for the Southern Canadian Cordillera
Author:
Watson, Emma; Luckman, Brian H.
Affiliation:
Department of Geography, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
Issue Date:
2001
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Citation:
Watson, E., Luckman, B.H. 2001. The development of a moisture-stressed tree-ring chronology network for the southern Canadian Cordillera. Tree-Ring Research 57(2):149-168.
Abstract:
Fifty-three ring-width chronologies have been developed from open-grown, low-elevation stands of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) and Pinar ponderosa (ponderosa pine) in the southern Canadian Cordillera. These chronologies will be used to develop precipitation reconstructions for the region. The sites are unevenly distributed across the interior valleys from east of the Coast Ranges to the Canadian Rockies and from the Canada-U.S. border to the northern limits of both species. The chronologies range from 123-691 years (mean = 383 years) and, on average, have a strong within-chronology common signal (Expressed Population Signal > 0.85) with as few as eight trees. A Rotated Principal Components Analysis (RPCA) identified three regions within which annual ring-width chronologies covary similarly. A preliminary assessment of regional chronologies and patterns of extreme narrow and wide marker rings demonstrates that common growth variations exist in the chronology network that are probably precipitation related. Both the RPCA and marker ring analyses suggest distinctive regional patterns of growth on both interannual and longer timescales that vary through time and are possibly linked to persistent large scale climatic anomalies.
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree rings
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Development of a Moisture-Stressed Tree-Ring Chronology Network for the Southern Canadian Cordilleraen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Emmaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuckman, Brian H.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geography, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.identifier.citationWatson, E., Luckman, B.H. 2001. The development of a moisture-stressed tree-ring chronology network for the southern Canadian Cordillera. Tree-Ring Research 57(2):149-168.en_US
dc.description.abstractFifty-three ring-width chronologies have been developed from open-grown, low-elevation stands of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) and Pinar ponderosa (ponderosa pine) in the southern Canadian Cordillera. These chronologies will be used to develop precipitation reconstructions for the region. The sites are unevenly distributed across the interior valleys from east of the Coast Ranges to the Canadian Rockies and from the Canada-U.S. border to the northern limits of both species. The chronologies range from 123-691 years (mean = 383 years) and, on average, have a strong within-chronology common signal (Expressed Population Signal > 0.85) with as few as eight trees. A Rotated Principal Components Analysis (RPCA) identified three regions within which annual ring-width chronologies covary similarly. A preliminary assessment of regional chronologies and patterns of extreme narrow and wide marker rings demonstrates that common growth variations exist in the chronology network that are probably precipitation related. Both the RPCA and marker ring analyses suggest distinctive regional patterns of growth on both interannual and longer timescales that vary through time and are possibly linked to persistent large scale climatic anomalies.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree ringsen_US
dc.identifier.citationWatson, E., Luckman, B.H. 2001. The development of a moisture-stressed tree-ring chronology network for the southern Canadian Cordillera. Tree-Ring Research 57(2):149-168.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/251652-
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
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