Aerosol Physicochemical Properties in Relation to Meteorology: Case Studies in Urban, Marine and Arid Settings

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/247258
Title:
Aerosol Physicochemical Properties in Relation to Meteorology: Case Studies in Urban, Marine and Arid Settings
Author:
Wonaschuetz, Anna
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 25-Mar-2013
Abstract:
Atmospheric aerosols are a highly relevant component of the climate system affecting atmospheric radiative transfer and the hydrological cycle. As opposed to other key atmospheric constituents with climatic relevance, atmospheric aerosol particles are highly heterogeneous in time and space with respect to their size, concentration, chemical composition and physical properties. Many aspects of their life cycle are not understood, making them difficult to represent in climate models and hard to control as a pollutant. Aerosol-cloud interactions in particular are infamous as a major source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Field measurements are an important source of information for the modeling community and can lead to a better understanding of chemical and microphysical processes. In this study, field data from urban, marine, and arid settings are analyzed and the impact of meteorological conditions on the evolution of aerosol particles while in the atmosphere is investigated. Particular attention is given to organic aerosols, which are a poorly understood component of atmospheric aerosols. Local wind characteristics, solar radiation, relative humidity and the presence or absence of clouds and fog are found to be crucial factors in the transport and chemical evolution of aerosol particles. Organic aerosols in particular are found to be heavily impacted by processes in the liquid phase (cloud droplets and aerosol water). The reported measurements serve to improve the process-level understanding of aerosol evolution in different environments and to inform the modeling community by providing realistic values for input parameters and validation of model calculations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
organic aerosols; shallow cumulus clouds; smelter; toxic metals; Atmospheric Sciences; aerosol particles; hygroscopic growth
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Atmospheric Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sorooshian, Armin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAerosol Physicochemical Properties in Relation to Meteorology: Case Studies in Urban, Marine and Arid Settingsen_US
dc.creatorWonaschuetz, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWonaschuetz, Annaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 25-Mar-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractAtmospheric aerosols are a highly relevant component of the climate system affecting atmospheric radiative transfer and the hydrological cycle. As opposed to other key atmospheric constituents with climatic relevance, atmospheric aerosol particles are highly heterogeneous in time and space with respect to their size, concentration, chemical composition and physical properties. Many aspects of their life cycle are not understood, making them difficult to represent in climate models and hard to control as a pollutant. Aerosol-cloud interactions in particular are infamous as a major source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Field measurements are an important source of information for the modeling community and can lead to a better understanding of chemical and microphysical processes. In this study, field data from urban, marine, and arid settings are analyzed and the impact of meteorological conditions on the evolution of aerosol particles while in the atmosphere is investigated. Particular attention is given to organic aerosols, which are a poorly understood component of atmospheric aerosols. Local wind characteristics, solar radiation, relative humidity and the presence or absence of clouds and fog are found to be crucial factors in the transport and chemical evolution of aerosol particles. Organic aerosols in particular are found to be heavily impacted by processes in the liquid phase (cloud droplets and aerosol water). The reported measurements serve to improve the process-level understanding of aerosol evolution in different environments and to inform the modeling community by providing realistic values for input parameters and validation of model calculations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectorganic aerosolsen_US
dc.subjectshallow cumulus cloudsen_US
dc.subjectsmelteren_US
dc.subjecttoxic metalsen_US
dc.subjectAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectaerosol particlesen_US
dc.subjecthygroscopic growthen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSorooshian, Arminen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetterton, Eric A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZeng, Xubinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirschboeck, Katherine K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSorooshian, Arminen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.