The Romantic Quest and the Disparity Between Sight and Understanding in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/245081
Title:
The Romantic Quest and the Disparity Between Sight and Understanding in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo
Author:
Simon, Debra Rachel
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In many cases of romantic pursuit, all other endeavors within the male's world are cast aside, with the conquest of a woman and her love alone dictating the character's actions. Much is the case in Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 film, Vertigo, which manages to build upon this tradition of the romantic quest, while still maintaining a sense of suspense and mystery. This time, John "Scottie" Ferguson fills the role of the male protagonist, falling madly in love with the woman he assumes to be Madeleine Elster. Unaware of Gavin Elster's plot to murder his wife, Scottie becomes wholly enamored with both the Madeleine impersonator and the romantic tale she helps form: in which Scottie is the hero of the romantic conquest. Much of the complications for Scottie arise from his inability to see and interpret the world around him: although he perceives Madeleine's image as reflections of true love, he remains blissfully unaware of the far more substantial feelings his caring confidant, Margaret "Midge" Wood, directs towards him. Scottie's continued inability to break free from the romantic quest, to abandon his pursuit to write his own heroic ending, leads to an ambiguous ending that showcases neither support for the protagonist's nor the audience's senses of authority or control.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Romantic Quest and the Disparity Between Sight and Understanding in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigoen_US
dc.creatorSimon, Debra Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Debra Rachelen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn many cases of romantic pursuit, all other endeavors within the male's world are cast aside, with the conquest of a woman and her love alone dictating the character's actions. Much is the case in Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 film, Vertigo, which manages to build upon this tradition of the romantic quest, while still maintaining a sense of suspense and mystery. This time, John "Scottie" Ferguson fills the role of the male protagonist, falling madly in love with the woman he assumes to be Madeleine Elster. Unaware of Gavin Elster's plot to murder his wife, Scottie becomes wholly enamored with both the Madeleine impersonator and the romantic tale she helps form: in which Scottie is the hero of the romantic conquest. Much of the complications for Scottie arise from his inability to see and interpret the world around him: although he perceives Madeleine's image as reflections of true love, he remains blissfully unaware of the far more substantial feelings his caring confidant, Margaret "Midge" Wood, directs towards him. Scottie's continued inability to break free from the romantic quest, to abandon his pursuit to write his own heroic ending, leads to an ambiguous ending that showcases neither support for the protagonist's nor the audience's senses of authority or control.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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