Romance Narrative and Problems of Succession in Geoffrey of Monmouth's HIstoria Regum Britanniae

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/245073
Title:
Romance Narrative and Problems of Succession in Geoffrey of Monmouth's HIstoria Regum Britanniae
Author:
Carlson, Erica
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Historia Regum Brittaniae of Geoffrey of Monmouth is one of the most influential works of Medieval English literature and historiography, and incorporates both genealogical and romance narrative. In this paper, I will first attempt to provide a general overview of the context of the Historia Regum Britanniae, including the debate about its historicity. Then I will adapt Laura Barefield’s discussion of gender within the work to a textual analysis of two romance episodes featuring two very different rulers: the founding patriarch Brutus and the lustful usurper Vortigern. I argue that the unambiguous establishment of the noble character of the former and the wicked character of the latter early on in their respective narratives are extremely important, as both men are leaders in times when the Britons are in the potentially destabilizing position of living side-by-side with - or being at war with - other civilizations. I will first examine the favorable outcomes of Brutus’s marriage with the Greek woman Ignoge and how it represents an ideal case of solving a problem of succession. Then I will discuss Vortigern’s depraved character and his ill-fated marriage to the Saxon woman Renwein, and how it sets up the conditions for a crisis of succession.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRomance Narrative and Problems of Succession in Geoffrey of Monmouth's HIstoria Regum Britanniaeen_US
dc.creatorCarlson, Ericaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarlson, Ericaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Historia Regum Brittaniae of Geoffrey of Monmouth is one of the most influential works of Medieval English literature and historiography, and incorporates both genealogical and romance narrative. In this paper, I will first attempt to provide a general overview of the context of the Historia Regum Britanniae, including the debate about its historicity. Then I will adapt Laura Barefield’s discussion of gender within the work to a textual analysis of two romance episodes featuring two very different rulers: the founding patriarch Brutus and the lustful usurper Vortigern. I argue that the unambiguous establishment of the noble character of the former and the wicked character of the latter early on in their respective narratives are extremely important, as both men are leaders in times when the Britons are in the potentially destabilizing position of living side-by-side with - or being at war with - other civilizations. I will first examine the favorable outcomes of Brutus’s marriage with the Greek woman Ignoge and how it represents an ideal case of solving a problem of succession. Then I will discuss Vortigern’s depraved character and his ill-fated marriage to the Saxon woman Renwein, and how it sets up the conditions for a crisis of succession.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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