Comparative Studies of the Desert Rodent Dipodomys Merriami and Munich Wistar Rat Urine Concentrating Mechanisms

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/245071
Title:
Comparative Studies of the Desert Rodent Dipodomys Merriami and Munich Wistar Rat Urine Concentrating Mechanisms
Author:
Barbaria, Arati Chatur
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Comparative studies of the mammalian renal medulla suggest that variations in the architecture of the thin limb of Henle’s loop contribute to variations in ability to produce concentrated urine. For this study, tubules and blood vessels of the renal inner medulla were identified by indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies and lectins that recognize segmentspecific proteins. Variations in axial expression of the water channel aquaporin 1 and the Cl channel ClC-K1 in the descending thin limb, suggest that equilibration of luminal fluid by water reabsorption occurs along a greater proportion of each loop length, and Cl reabsorption occurs along a shorter proportion of each prebend loop length in Dipodomys than in the Munich-Wistar rat. Interstitial nodal spaces adjacent to CDs exist in both species and preferential solute diffusion into these spaces may play a significant role in driving fluid reabsorption from CDs. In the terminal papilla, the ATL-to-CD surface area ratio is markedly greater in the Munich-Wistar rat, suggesting that NaCl reabsorption may have less of an impact on water reabsorption from terminal CDs in Dipodomys.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleComparative Studies of the Desert Rodent Dipodomys Merriami and Munich Wistar Rat Urine Concentrating Mechanismsen_US
dc.creatorBarbaria, Arati Chaturen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarbaria, Arati Chaturen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractComparative studies of the mammalian renal medulla suggest that variations in the architecture of the thin limb of Henle’s loop contribute to variations in ability to produce concentrated urine. For this study, tubules and blood vessels of the renal inner medulla were identified by indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies and lectins that recognize segmentspecific proteins. Variations in axial expression of the water channel aquaporin 1 and the Cl channel ClC-K1 in the descending thin limb, suggest that equilibration of luminal fluid by water reabsorption occurs along a greater proportion of each loop length, and Cl reabsorption occurs along a shorter proportion of each prebend loop length in Dipodomys than in the Munich-Wistar rat. Interstitial nodal spaces adjacent to CDs exist in both species and preferential solute diffusion into these spaces may play a significant role in driving fluid reabsorption from CDs. In the terminal papilla, the ATL-to-CD surface area ratio is markedly greater in the Munich-Wistar rat, suggesting that NaCl reabsorption may have less of an impact on water reabsorption from terminal CDs in Dipodomys.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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