The Burden of Antibiotic Resistance: Casual Social and Structural Factors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244845
Title:
The Burden of Antibiotic Resistance: Casual Social and Structural Factors
Author:
White, Chelsi Jean
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Antibiotic resistance has become a global burden, affecting both highly developed and less developed countries. Resistance results in increased morbidity and mortality, especially in children under five. The principles of resistance are understood biologically but the social and structural factors that perpetuate it are far more complex and integrated on an individual, household and community level. The solution to combat resistance thus must be more than the continuous development and production of new antibiotics, which is quickly transitioning from a solution to a causal factor, and instead target behaviors and systems that promote resistance. This thesis investigates the causal social and structural factors of antibiotic resistance in the Andean Region of South America; geographically diverse though with limited research conducted on remote and rural communities. The main factors discussed within pertain to those that if enhanced or corrected, would begin to decrease the probability or minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance including sanitation and agricultural practice, strong community leadership in education, and improved communication and modes of surveillance.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; International Interdisciplinary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Burden of Antibiotic Resistance: Casual Social and Structural Factorsen_US
dc.creatorWhite, Chelsi Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Chelsi Jeanen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAntibiotic resistance has become a global burden, affecting both highly developed and less developed countries. Resistance results in increased morbidity and mortality, especially in children under five. The principles of resistance are understood biologically but the social and structural factors that perpetuate it are far more complex and integrated on an individual, household and community level. The solution to combat resistance thus must be more than the continuous development and production of new antibiotics, which is quickly transitioning from a solution to a causal factor, and instead target behaviors and systems that promote resistance. This thesis investigates the causal social and structural factors of antibiotic resistance in the Andean Region of South America; geographically diverse though with limited research conducted on remote and rural communities. The main factors discussed within pertain to those that if enhanced or corrected, would begin to decrease the probability or minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance including sanitation and agricultural practice, strong community leadership in education, and improved communication and modes of surveillance.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Interdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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