Spatial Awareness and Memory Reconsolidation: The Role of Spatial Awareness in Memory Updating

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244842
Title:
Spatial Awareness and Memory Reconsolidation: The Role of Spatial Awareness in Memory Updating
Author:
Wager, Erica Elizabeth
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Hubach, Gomez, Hardt and Nadel (2007) provided the first demonstration of reconsolidation of episodic memory in humans. Memory for a set of20 objects was modified by the presentation of a new set of 20 objects if and only if participants were reminded of the first learning episode before learning the new set. Hupbach, Hardt, Gomez and Nadel (200S) then explored the importance of spatial context in the reminder condition. A bimodal split between participants in memory updating occurred when they were brought to a different context for Session 3. The present study investigates this bimodal split by distributing a spatial awareness assessment during Session 3 using the same methods as Hupbach et al. (200S). Forty-two adults aged lS-25 were tested in two paradigms. A significant difference was found between average intrusion rate of Low SAA scorers and High SAA scorers (p = .01S). A correlation was found between intrusion rate and spatial awareness assessment score in Set 1 recall (R² = .49) while no correlation (R² = .05) was found for intrusions into Set 2 recall. These implications are important for learning how memory updating occurs in different types of people, highly spatially aware and average or low spatially aware.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSpatial Awareness and Memory Reconsolidation: The Role of Spatial Awareness in Memory Updatingen_US
dc.creatorWager, Erica Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorWager, Erica Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHubach, Gomez, Hardt and Nadel (2007) provided the first demonstration of reconsolidation of episodic memory in humans. Memory for a set of20 objects was modified by the presentation of a new set of 20 objects if and only if participants were reminded of the first learning episode before learning the new set. Hupbach, Hardt, Gomez and Nadel (200S) then explored the importance of spatial context in the reminder condition. A bimodal split between participants in memory updating occurred when they were brought to a different context for Session 3. The present study investigates this bimodal split by distributing a spatial awareness assessment during Session 3 using the same methods as Hupbach et al. (200S). Forty-two adults aged lS-25 were tested in two paradigms. A significant difference was found between average intrusion rate of Low SAA scorers and High SAA scorers (p = .01S). A correlation was found between intrusion rate and spatial awareness assessment score in Set 1 recall (R² = .49) while no correlation (R² = .05) was found for intrusions into Set 2 recall. These implications are important for learning how memory updating occurs in different types of people, highly spatially aware and average or low spatially aware.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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