Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244840
Title:
Infants Can Use a Newly Learned Object for Scene Segregation
Author:
Viator, Sara Stites
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the present study, we tested whether prior experience of an object allows infants to segregate a display when competing cues operate against this interpretation. 4.5-month-olds were shown three exemplars of a novel object. Infants were familiarized with a test display consisting of a new exemplar of the novel object abutted against a complementary object. The infants then viewed one of two events in which 1)the objects moved together as a single entity or 2)moved independently indicating their separation. Infants looked longer at the move-together event (M=30.35 sec) than at the move-apart event (M=14.72 sec),t(17)=3.41, p.003 indicating that the novel object was segregated from its complement. Infants in a control experiment who were not familiarized with the novel object, showed no differences in looking times, (M(Move-together)=17.76 sec, M(Move-apart)=17.92 sec),t(16)=0.04, p≤.97. For the first time we show that a small amount of prior experience can exert an effect that overpowers other cues for grouping. Furthermore, 4.5- month-old infants can use a newly learned object for scene segregation despite the fact that the grouping cues in the test stimulus operate against this interpretation. Finally, we show that object learning is robust enough to transfer from 3D presentation with real objects to a video display.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInfants Can Use a Newly Learned Object for Scene Segregationen_US
dc.creatorViator, Sara Stitesen_US
dc.contributor.authorViator, Sara Stitesen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, we tested whether prior experience of an object allows infants to segregate a display when competing cues operate against this interpretation. 4.5-month-olds were shown three exemplars of a novel object. Infants were familiarized with a test display consisting of a new exemplar of the novel object abutted against a complementary object. The infants then viewed one of two events in which 1)the objects moved together as a single entity or 2)moved independently indicating their separation. Infants looked longer at the move-together event (M=30.35 sec) than at the move-apart event (M=14.72 sec),t(17)=3.41, p.003 indicating that the novel object was segregated from its complement. Infants in a control experiment who were not familiarized with the novel object, showed no differences in looking times, (M(Move-together)=17.76 sec, M(Move-apart)=17.92 sec),t(16)=0.04, p≤.97. For the first time we show that a small amount of prior experience can exert an effect that overpowers other cues for grouping. Furthermore, 4.5- month-old infants can use a newly learned object for scene segregation despite the fact that the grouping cues in the test stimulus operate against this interpretation. Finally, we show that object learning is robust enough to transfer from 3D presentation with real objects to a video display.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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