Alternative Food Venues and Food Waste: From Cultivation to Consumption

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244835
Title:
Alternative Food Venues and Food Waste: From Cultivation to Consumption
Author:
Trimble, Daniella Patricia
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 2010, 33 million tons of food made its way to landfills in the United States alone (Environmental Protection Agency 2012). That same year 925 million people worldwide were undernourished, 98 percent of them in developing countries (Food and Agriculture Organization 2010). It is this contrast and threats to future global food production that has motivated the study of food systems and particularly of food waste. Existing literature on consumer level food waste almost exclusively emphasizes quantifying and characterizing the behavior of the average American consumer (Gallo 1980, Griffin 2009, Rathje 1996, Van Garde 1987). One question that has garnered far less attention from scholars, however, is how and why a small percentage of American consumers are beginning to make concerted efforts to prevent their personal food waste. This study analyzes survey and interview responses from target groups who acquire their food from non-conventional, alternative market sources in an attempt to find the reasons why certain individuals waste less than the average American consumer. The interview data suggests that consumer participants in these markets experience elevated value and sentiment toward their foods, which ultimately results in heightened consciousness surrounding both food consumption and disposal.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAlternative Food Venues and Food Waste: From Cultivation to Consumptionen_US
dc.creatorTrimble, Daniella Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrimble, Daniella Patriciaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2010, 33 million tons of food made its way to landfills in the United States alone (Environmental Protection Agency 2012). That same year 925 million people worldwide were undernourished, 98 percent of them in developing countries (Food and Agriculture Organization 2010). It is this contrast and threats to future global food production that has motivated the study of food systems and particularly of food waste. Existing literature on consumer level food waste almost exclusively emphasizes quantifying and characterizing the behavior of the average American consumer (Gallo 1980, Griffin 2009, Rathje 1996, Van Garde 1987). One question that has garnered far less attention from scholars, however, is how and why a small percentage of American consumers are beginning to make concerted efforts to prevent their personal food waste. This study analyzes survey and interview responses from target groups who acquire their food from non-conventional, alternative market sources in an attempt to find the reasons why certain individuals waste less than the average American consumer. The interview data suggests that consumer participants in these markets experience elevated value and sentiment toward their foods, which ultimately results in heightened consciousness surrounding both food consumption and disposal.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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