The Role of Peripheral Afferent Input in Cancer-Induced Ongoing Bone Pain and Movement-Induced Incident Pain

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244813
Title:
The Role of Peripheral Afferent Input in Cancer-Induced Ongoing Bone Pain and Movement-Induced Incident Pain
Author:
Tiutan, Timothy Paul
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Cancer-induced bone pain is described as persistent, dull pain that increases in intensity with disease progression. Cancer patients experience ongoing pain and breakthrough pain, defined as transient periods of moderate to severe pain that break through ongoing pain medication. A better understanding of differences in mechanisms driving these aspects of cancer-induced pain may lead to development of more effective pain therapeutics with fewer side effects than currently used treatments. To address this issue, we have developed a preclinical rat model where breast cancer cells are injected in the right tibia of female rats, allowing for cancer growth, metastases, and subsequent bone degradation as revealed by radiographic analyses. To measure ongoing pain, we adapted the conditioned placed preference (CPP) paradigm, which uses negative reinforcement to determine the rewarding aspects of pain alleviating manipulations. A conditioned placed avoidance (CPA) paradigm was used to measure movement-induced incident pain. Our data indicate that peripheral nerve block alleviates cancer-induced ongoing pain, revealing that afferent input maintains ongoing pain. Palpation of the tumor-bearing limb produces CPA, likely reflecting movement-induced breakthrough pain as observed in cancer patients. Such results contribute to the overall goal of developing better therapeutics, thereby improving the quality of life for cancer patients.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Peripheral Afferent Input in Cancer-Induced Ongoing Bone Pain and Movement-Induced Incident Painen_US
dc.creatorTiutan, Timothy Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorTiutan, Timothy Paulen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCancer-induced bone pain is described as persistent, dull pain that increases in intensity with disease progression. Cancer patients experience ongoing pain and breakthrough pain, defined as transient periods of moderate to severe pain that break through ongoing pain medication. A better understanding of differences in mechanisms driving these aspects of cancer-induced pain may lead to development of more effective pain therapeutics with fewer side effects than currently used treatments. To address this issue, we have developed a preclinical rat model where breast cancer cells are injected in the right tibia of female rats, allowing for cancer growth, metastases, and subsequent bone degradation as revealed by radiographic analyses. To measure ongoing pain, we adapted the conditioned placed preference (CPP) paradigm, which uses negative reinforcement to determine the rewarding aspects of pain alleviating manipulations. A conditioned placed avoidance (CPA) paradigm was used to measure movement-induced incident pain. Our data indicate that peripheral nerve block alleviates cancer-induced ongoing pain, revealing that afferent input maintains ongoing pain. Palpation of the tumor-bearing limb produces CPA, likely reflecting movement-induced breakthrough pain as observed in cancer patients. Such results contribute to the overall goal of developing better therapeutics, thereby improving the quality of life for cancer patients.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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