Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244811
Title:
National Identities in the Post-Devolution United Kingdom
Author:
Sullivan, Thomas
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Constitutional reform (devolution) fundamentally altered the political positions of the nations of the United Kingdom, allowing them to embrace a greater degree of self-determination. This works seeks to analyze both state-level and sub-state-level national identities in the United Kingdom. Using analysis of large-scale surveys as well as smaller scale research projects, this work seeks to examine the meanings, connotations, and inclusivity of the national identities of England and Scotland (English, Scottish and British). It also seeks to find trends in identification in the years since (and immediately before) the advent of devolution. This analysis suggests that meanings and connotations of the various national identities vary greatly, both between the nations of the UK and within them. With such a flux in meaning, inclusivity is difficult to measure but Scottish identity is found to be more inclusive. After initial shifts around the time of devolution, both Scotland and England appear to have experienced relative stability in national identification recently. Political implications are unclear, however, as national identity does not directly correspond with desire for constitutional change.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Interdisciplinary/International Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNational Identities in the Post-Devolution United Kingdomen_US
dc.creatorSullivan, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractConstitutional reform (devolution) fundamentally altered the political positions of the nations of the United Kingdom, allowing them to embrace a greater degree of self-determination. This works seeks to analyze both state-level and sub-state-level national identities in the United Kingdom. Using analysis of large-scale surveys as well as smaller scale research projects, this work seeks to examine the meanings, connotations, and inclusivity of the national identities of England and Scotland (English, Scottish and British). It also seeks to find trends in identification in the years since (and immediately before) the advent of devolution. This analysis suggests that meanings and connotations of the various national identities vary greatly, both between the nations of the UK and within them. With such a flux in meaning, inclusivity is difficult to measure but Scottish identity is found to be more inclusive. After initial shifts around the time of devolution, both Scotland and England appear to have experienced relative stability in national identification recently. Political implications are unclear, however, as national identity does not directly correspond with desire for constitutional change.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary/International Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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