Translation in Transition: The Feasibility and Effectiveness of Crowdsourced Translation Versus Professional Translation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244800
Title:
Translation in Transition: The Feasibility and Effectiveness of Crowdsourced Translation Versus Professional Translation
Author:
Sobol, Forest Julia
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Translation services are an essential part of successful human interaction in the modern world. While professional translators have served humanity for millennia, the world is rapidly evolving, and translation needs are evolving as well. Those who use translation services are seeking faster, more efficient, and less expensive means for meeting their translation needs. The demand for alternatives to professional translation services has led to the birth of crowdsourced translation. Crowdsourced translation is the process by which text is translated using the collective knowledge of a group of people. The group, or "crowd", is most often accessed via the Internet. Because it employs the services of many individuals and the high-speed communications capabilities of the Internet, crowdsourcing is a fast, low-cost method of producing translations. Some professional translators question the feasibility of crowdsourced translation, while some of those involved in crowdsourced translation argue that crowdsourcing is superior because of its speed and cost-effectiveness. This paper investigates these claims and explores the strengths and weaknesses of each method in a variety of likely scenarios.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Spanish
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTranslation in Transition: The Feasibility and Effectiveness of Crowdsourced Translation Versus Professional Translationen_US
dc.creatorSobol, Forest Juliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSobol, Forest Juliaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTranslation services are an essential part of successful human interaction in the modern world. While professional translators have served humanity for millennia, the world is rapidly evolving, and translation needs are evolving as well. Those who use translation services are seeking faster, more efficient, and less expensive means for meeting their translation needs. The demand for alternatives to professional translation services has led to the birth of crowdsourced translation. Crowdsourced translation is the process by which text is translated using the collective knowledge of a group of people. The group, or "crowd", is most often accessed via the Internet. Because it employs the services of many individuals and the high-speed communications capabilities of the Internet, crowdsourcing is a fast, low-cost method of producing translations. Some professional translators question the feasibility of crowdsourced translation, while some of those involved in crowdsourced translation argue that crowdsourcing is superior because of its speed and cost-effectiveness. This paper investigates these claims and explores the strengths and weaknesses of each method in a variety of likely scenarios.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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