Efficacy of Treating Foodborne Pathogens with Trichloromelamine and Ozone

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244792
Title:
Efficacy of Treating Foodborne Pathogens with Trichloromelamine and Ozone
Author:
Schneider, Lauren Noelle
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Due to the major public health problem of illnesses caused by foodborne pathogens, an efficient disinfecting method is needed during food processing. In an experiment to determine the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents, two disinfectants, trichloromelamine (TCM) and ozone, were compared. Samples of beef were separately inoculated with Escherichia coli and coliforms, Salmonella typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni. Infected meat samples were each sprayed with TCM and ozone to kill the bacteria. After incubation, meat samples were either swabbed or bacteria on the meat were rubbed off into sterile deionized water. Dilutions of collected bacterial samples were plated for counting. Beef samples infected with E. coli and coliforms treated with TCM had an 82.3% decrease in coliforms and a 98.2% decrease in E. coli, while ozone did not kill the bacteria. Beef samples infected with S. typhimurium showed a 61.3% decrease in pathogens when treated with ozone and no decrease when treated with TCM. Samples infected with C. jejuni showed a 100% decrease when treated with TCM and a 68.5% decrease when treated with ozone. Conflicting results made it difficult to determine which antimicrobial is best, although TCM may be more effective, so further testing is necessary.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Veterinary Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEfficacy of Treating Foodborne Pathogens with Trichloromelamine and Ozoneen_US
dc.creatorSchneider, Lauren Noelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Lauren Noelleen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDue to the major public health problem of illnesses caused by foodborne pathogens, an efficient disinfecting method is needed during food processing. In an experiment to determine the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents, two disinfectants, trichloromelamine (TCM) and ozone, were compared. Samples of beef were separately inoculated with Escherichia coli and coliforms, Salmonella typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni. Infected meat samples were each sprayed with TCM and ozone to kill the bacteria. After incubation, meat samples were either swabbed or bacteria on the meat were rubbed off into sterile deionized water. Dilutions of collected bacterial samples were plated for counting. Beef samples infected with E. coli and coliforms treated with TCM had an 82.3% decrease in coliforms and a 98.2% decrease in E. coli, while ozone did not kill the bacteria. Beef samples infected with S. typhimurium showed a 61.3% decrease in pathogens when treated with ozone and no decrease when treated with TCM. Samples infected with C. jejuni showed a 100% decrease when treated with TCM and a 68.5% decrease when treated with ozone. Conflicting results made it difficult to determine which antimicrobial is best, although TCM may be more effective, so further testing is necessary.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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