Invisible Bodies on the Borders of War: The Hidden Role of National Security in Rape Culture

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244789
Title:
Invisible Bodies on the Borders of War: The Hidden Role of National Security in Rape Culture
Author:
Stringer, Rachel Nicole
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The social construction of immigration as question of national security has led to the criminalization of immigration. Criminalization has encouraged the idea that greater security is needed, spiraling into the characterization of the US/Mexico border as a war zone. This is seen through the greatly increased military presence along the border as well as the militarization of the Border Patrol. This war is being waged against women's bodies, both through assaults committed by US officials and by systematically preventing immigrants from accessing resources for survivors of sexual violence. The structural and institutional causes of this sexual assault epidemic cannot be explained by current feminist frameworks for understanding sexual assault. In order to prevent future assaults, we must restructure our immigration policies and separate immigration from the Department of Homeland Security and the privatized prison-industrial complex.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Gender and Women's Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInvisible Bodies on the Borders of War: The Hidden Role of National Security in Rape Cultureen_US
dc.creatorStringer, Rachel Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.authorStringer, Rachel Nicoleen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe social construction of immigration as question of national security has led to the criminalization of immigration. Criminalization has encouraged the idea that greater security is needed, spiraling into the characterization of the US/Mexico border as a war zone. This is seen through the greatly increased military presence along the border as well as the militarization of the Border Patrol. This war is being waged against women's bodies, both through assaults committed by US officials and by systematically preventing immigrants from accessing resources for survivors of sexual violence. The structural and institutional causes of this sexual assault epidemic cannot be explained by current feminist frameworks for understanding sexual assault. In order to prevent future assaults, we must restructure our immigration policies and separate immigration from the Department of Homeland Security and the privatized prison-industrial complex.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGender and Women's Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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