Greetings from the Peanut (Allergy) Gallery: Novel Treatments of Peanut Allergy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244785
Title:
Greetings from the Peanut (Allergy) Gallery: Novel Treatments of Peanut Allergy
Author:
Soulsby, William Daniel, III
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Peanut allergy is among the most prevalent and dangerous forms of allergy in today’s society. Although the physiological mechanism of peanut allergy is well understood as an IgE-mediated immunologic disorder, reasons for unbalanced proportions of this allergy across the world are not completely known. With increasing rates of peanut allergy across the world, especially in the United States, a focus on more effective treatments is essential. Currently, the two most widely used methods of treatment of peanut allergy are injectable epinephrine (EpiPen) in preventing anaphylaxis and over-the-counter antihistamines (i.e. Benadryl). However, neither of these medications is completely effective for treating the wide range of symptoms that allergic patients suffer from. Perhaps, more effective treatments can be found in novel realms, including oral immunotherapy and plasmid DNA immunization, to increase a patient’s tolerance to peanut in cases of accidental ingestion of allergen. Anti-IgE therapy is a new treatment aimed at blocking the ability of IgE to bind to mast cells, stopping IgE from mediating the release of the chemotactic and inflammatory factors that initiate the allergic reaction. Finally, new research in combined therapies for treating anaphylaxis and Chinese herbal medicines may create a new way to target a broader range of symptoms that peanut allergic patients experience during an allergic reaction.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGreetings from the Peanut (Allergy) Gallery: Novel Treatments of Peanut Allergyen_US
dc.creatorSoulsby, William Daniel, IIIen_US
dc.contributor.authorSoulsby, William Daniel, IIIen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPeanut allergy is among the most prevalent and dangerous forms of allergy in today’s society. Although the physiological mechanism of peanut allergy is well understood as an IgE-mediated immunologic disorder, reasons for unbalanced proportions of this allergy across the world are not completely known. With increasing rates of peanut allergy across the world, especially in the United States, a focus on more effective treatments is essential. Currently, the two most widely used methods of treatment of peanut allergy are injectable epinephrine (EpiPen) in preventing anaphylaxis and over-the-counter antihistamines (i.e. Benadryl). However, neither of these medications is completely effective for treating the wide range of symptoms that allergic patients suffer from. Perhaps, more effective treatments can be found in novel realms, including oral immunotherapy and plasmid DNA immunization, to increase a patient’s tolerance to peanut in cases of accidental ingestion of allergen. Anti-IgE therapy is a new treatment aimed at blocking the ability of IgE to bind to mast cells, stopping IgE from mediating the release of the chemotactic and inflammatory factors that initiate the allergic reaction. Finally, new research in combined therapies for treating anaphylaxis and Chinese herbal medicines may create a new way to target a broader range of symptoms that peanut allergic patients experience during an allergic reaction.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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