Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244782
Title:
The Role of Drosophila Neurexin-1 in Mushroom Body Development
Author:
Shim, Kevin Guanwen
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Thesis Not Available (per Author's Request)
Abstract:
Neurexins are transmembrane adhesion proteins that have a demonstrated role in proper synaptic function and protein organization. Neurexin-deficient laboratory animals have behavioral and learning deficits. In humans, NRXN mutations cause, and increase the risk of, a wide range of neurocognitive disorders including autism, intellectual disability, and schizophrenia. Here I report on the effect of loss-of-function mutations in the single NRXN ortholog found in fruit flies, Drosophila neurexin-1 (dnrx), on neuronal morphology. Limited evidence has suggested that neurexins play a role in cytoskeletal organization and in regulating dendritogenesis. This study aimed to answer the question of whether or not neurexin proteins are necessary for the inherent morphological organization of the neuron. My results indicate that dnrx mutants display no overall structural defects in mushroom body (MB) morphology in vivo, but their MB neurons have distinct morphological features when cultured and analyzed in vitro. Quantitative analysis of cultured mutant pupal brain neurons revealed distinct alteration in morphology that was selective to MB γ-neurons. This change manifests itself in a significant increase in higher-order branching and branchpoint density. I also report here on a novel vacuole phenotype observed in the cell bodies of cultured neurons.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Drosophila Neurexin-1 in Mushroom Body Developmenten_US
dc.creatorShim, Kevin Guanwenen_US
dc.contributor.authorShim, Kevin Guanwenen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseThesis Not Available (per Author's Request)en_US
dc.description.abstractNeurexins are transmembrane adhesion proteins that have a demonstrated role in proper synaptic function and protein organization. Neurexin-deficient laboratory animals have behavioral and learning deficits. In humans, NRXN mutations cause, and increase the risk of, a wide range of neurocognitive disorders including autism, intellectual disability, and schizophrenia. Here I report on the effect of loss-of-function mutations in the single NRXN ortholog found in fruit flies, Drosophila neurexin-1 (dnrx), on neuronal morphology. Limited evidence has suggested that neurexins play a role in cytoskeletal organization and in regulating dendritogenesis. This study aimed to answer the question of whether or not neurexin proteins are necessary for the inherent morphological organization of the neuron. My results indicate that dnrx mutants display no overall structural defects in mushroom body (MB) morphology in vivo, but their MB neurons have distinct morphological features when cultured and analyzed in vitro. Quantitative analysis of cultured mutant pupal brain neurons revealed distinct alteration in morphology that was selective to MB γ-neurons. This change manifests itself in a significant increase in higher-order branching and branchpoint density. I also report here on a novel vacuole phenotype observed in the cell bodies of cultured neurons.en_US
dc.description.noteThesis restricted per author's request, March 5, 2013 / kcen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.