The 'Arc': A Solution for Peace, Finding a Two-State Solution Through Infrastructure Strategies in the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244778
Title:
The 'Arc': A Solution for Peace, Finding a Two-State Solution Through Infrastructure Strategies in the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict
Author:
Segel, Neil Elliot
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Israeli/Palestinian conflict is one of the longest-standing discords in modern history. International actors have attempted innumerable approaches to create a decisive and lasting peace, to little avail. This thesis investigates the realistic potential of a large-scale infrastructure project to alter the conflict status quo and lay the foundations for a peaceful two-state solution. Operating on the premise that a two-state solution is the only feasible outcome, this thesis investigates the potential of 'The Arc' - a corridor of infrastructure linking the physically separate halves of Palestine (the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) - to create the necessary preconditions for a unified Palestinian Authority. This in turn could be the tipping point towards a lasting two-state solution. Building on previous research from the RAND Corporation, this dissertation analyzes the degree of the total project potential, the necessary components, the outcomes, and what success could mean for all parties involved. Through case studies of similar projects it is possible to extrapolate theory applicable to conjoining the Gaza Strip and the West Bank. This analysis will also determine the extent of monetary risk any third-party will endure. The conclusion highlights the findings of this investigation as well as strategic policy suggestions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; International Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe 'Arc': A Solution for Peace, Finding a Two-State Solution Through Infrastructure Strategies in the Israeli/Palestinian Conflicten_US
dc.creatorSegel, Neil Ellioten_US
dc.contributor.authorSegel, Neil Ellioten_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Israeli/Palestinian conflict is one of the longest-standing discords in modern history. International actors have attempted innumerable approaches to create a decisive and lasting peace, to little avail. This thesis investigates the realistic potential of a large-scale infrastructure project to alter the conflict status quo and lay the foundations for a peaceful two-state solution. Operating on the premise that a two-state solution is the only feasible outcome, this thesis investigates the potential of 'The Arc' - a corridor of infrastructure linking the physically separate halves of Palestine (the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) - to create the necessary preconditions for a unified Palestinian Authority. This in turn could be the tipping point towards a lasting two-state solution. Building on previous research from the RAND Corporation, this dissertation analyzes the degree of the total project potential, the necessary components, the outcomes, and what success could mean for all parties involved. Through case studies of similar projects it is possible to extrapolate theory applicable to conjoining the Gaza Strip and the West Bank. This analysis will also determine the extent of monetary risk any third-party will endure. The conclusion highlights the findings of this investigation as well as strategic policy suggestions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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