Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244775
Title:
The Chicago Store: Preservation + Residential Urban Density
Author:
Sauer, James Thomas
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis, completed in an architectural design studio, addresses the conflicts between, and potential compatibilities of, historic preservation and urban residential density through consideration of the specific case of downtown Tucson’s very low residential density and two commercial buildings therein. 128 and 130 E Congress Street, constructed in 1903, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and have housed the JC Penney Company (1927 - 1957) and the Chicago Store music store (1967 - today). A 20,000 square foot, three story residential addition above the existing building is proposed. Appropriate rehabilitation of existing underutilized historic buildings is considered simultaneously with the introduction of vertical residential additions. Many issues of compatible yet distinct additions are addressed including: scale, mass, material, and form; structure and circulation; efficient indoor/outdoor residences; and the poetics of old and new and the liminal spaces between. These issues are examined through photography, diagrams, text, architectural drawings in orthographic and isometric projection, analysis of census data, analysis of architectural precedent, and architectural perspective renderings. Particular attention is paid to structural issues and a thorough analysis of preservation issues of significance, period of significance, character defining features, and integrity.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.Arch.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Chicago Store: Preservation + Residential Urban Densityen_US
dc.creatorSauer, James Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorSauer, James Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis, completed in an architectural design studio, addresses the conflicts between, and potential compatibilities of, historic preservation and urban residential density through consideration of the specific case of downtown Tucson’s very low residential density and two commercial buildings therein. 128 and 130 E Congress Street, constructed in 1903, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and have housed the JC Penney Company (1927 - 1957) and the Chicago Store music store (1967 - today). A 20,000 square foot, three story residential addition above the existing building is proposed. Appropriate rehabilitation of existing underutilized historic buildings is considered simultaneously with the introduction of vertical residential additions. Many issues of compatible yet distinct additions are addressed including: scale, mass, material, and form; structure and circulation; efficient indoor/outdoor residences; and the poetics of old and new and the liminal spaces between. These issues are examined through photography, diagrams, text, architectural drawings in orthographic and isometric projection, analysis of census data, analysis of architectural precedent, and architectural perspective renderings. Particular attention is paid to structural issues and a thorough analysis of preservation issues of significance, period of significance, character defining features, and integrity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.Arch.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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