Fast Access Categorization of Familiar Shapes Can Be Independent from Perception

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244774
Title:
Fast Access Categorization of Familiar Shapes Can Be Independent from Perception
Author:
Sasaki-Crupi, Maxwell Ian
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Visual perception has typically been explained using a feed forward processing model. Several studies indicate that categorization of familiar objects can take place using this processing method. I investigated whether categorization of familiar versus novel silhouettes was slowed when another familiar object is potentially present and not perceived. Through 80 trials, subjects were shown two silhouettes, one familiar and one novel, with the task of finding the familiar silhouette. Familiar silhouettes represented everyday objects, while novel were never seen before. Half of the novel silhouettes contained familiar shapes suggested on the outside edges but not perceived. The average saccade toward the familiar shape during the experimental silhouette condition was significantly slower in both Experiment 1 (281 ms vs. 267 ms, p < .02) and Experiment 2 (217 vs. 208 ms, p < .01). This study showed that although fast categorization can take place, there must be mechanisms of feedback for perception to ultimately occur.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFast Access Categorization of Familiar Shapes Can Be Independent from Perceptionen_US
dc.creatorSasaki-Crupi, Maxwell Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorSasaki-Crupi, Maxwell Ianen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractVisual perception has typically been explained using a feed forward processing model. Several studies indicate that categorization of familiar objects can take place using this processing method. I investigated whether categorization of familiar versus novel silhouettes was slowed when another familiar object is potentially present and not perceived. Through 80 trials, subjects were shown two silhouettes, one familiar and one novel, with the task of finding the familiar silhouette. Familiar silhouettes represented everyday objects, while novel were never seen before. Half of the novel silhouettes contained familiar shapes suggested on the outside edges but not perceived. The average saccade toward the familiar shape during the experimental silhouette condition was significantly slower in both Experiment 1 (281 ms vs. 267 ms, p < .02) and Experiment 2 (217 vs. 208 ms, p < .01). This study showed that although fast categorization can take place, there must be mechanisms of feedback for perception to ultimately occur.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.