Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244771
Title:
Reproductive Competition of Bemisia Tabaci Biotypes on Cotton
Author:
Rogan, Daniel Thomas
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The sweetpotato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) is a destructive agricultural pest worldwide and in Arizona. Currently, in Arizona, the dominant population in field crops (such as cotton) is comprised exclusively of biotype B, whereas greenhouse populations (on ornamental plants, such as poinsettia) are comprised of biotype B, haplotype 1 of the Q1 subclade (Q1H2) of biotype Q, and haplotype 45 of the Q2 subclade (Q2H45) of biotype Q. To determine the potential field invasiveness of the Q1H2 and Q2H45, mixed cohorts were established on pesticide-free cotton containing either B/Q1H2, B/Q2H45, or Q1H2/Q2H45 competitions. The biotype composition of each cohort was monitored via periodic sampling and biotype determination. As expected, the B biotype dominated the Q biotype; unexpectedly, however, the Q2H45 biotype lasted longer than Q1H2 (B biotype dominance occurred at the 3rd and 2nd generations, respectively). Also unexpectedly, the Q2H45 biotype is maintaining ~95% dominance over Q1H2 (currently at the 3rd generation). The local Q2H45 haplotype of whitefly, compared to global strains, seems to exhibit a greater level of invasiveness relative to the local Q1H2 haplotype, though the B biotype out-competes both Q strains in a selection-free environment.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleReproductive Competition of Bemisia Tabaci Biotypes on Cottonen_US
dc.creatorRogan, Daniel Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorRogan, Daniel Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe sweetpotato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) is a destructive agricultural pest worldwide and in Arizona. Currently, in Arizona, the dominant population in field crops (such as cotton) is comprised exclusively of biotype B, whereas greenhouse populations (on ornamental plants, such as poinsettia) are comprised of biotype B, haplotype 1 of the Q1 subclade (Q1H2) of biotype Q, and haplotype 45 of the Q2 subclade (Q2H45) of biotype Q. To determine the potential field invasiveness of the Q1H2 and Q2H45, mixed cohorts were established on pesticide-free cotton containing either B/Q1H2, B/Q2H45, or Q1H2/Q2H45 competitions. The biotype composition of each cohort was monitored via periodic sampling and biotype determination. As expected, the B biotype dominated the Q biotype; unexpectedly, however, the Q2H45 biotype lasted longer than Q1H2 (B biotype dominance occurred at the 3rd and 2nd generations, respectively). Also unexpectedly, the Q2H45 biotype is maintaining ~95% dominance over Q1H2 (currently at the 3rd generation). The local Q2H45 haplotype of whitefly, compared to global strains, seems to exhibit a greater level of invasiveness relative to the local Q1H2 haplotype, though the B biotype out-competes both Q strains in a selection-free environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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