Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244752
Title:
Impact of Pro-Biotic Administration on an Acute Coronary Event
Author:
Regan, Jessica Ann
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Aims: Recent studies have suggested promising health benefits for pro-biotics in humans. Most of these studies focus on the advantages of pro-biotics in relation to immune function, but little has been done to evaluate the impact of pro-biotics on inflammatory response and cardiovascular health. In the present study we investigated the impact of pro-biotic administration on mice prior to and following an acute coronary event. Methods and Results: We compared male mice on high-fat or normal diet that were gavaged for 4 weeks with a B. lactis strain of probiotic or with saline for control. Mice were then subjected to myocardial infarction or sham surgery. Mice administered B. lactis were found to have an attenuated weight gain on both high-fat and normal diet compared to saline controls. Mice treated with B. lactis displayed an infarct area of 10.5±3.0%, which is significantly less (p<0.01) than the infarct area of saline treated mice (29.5±4.7%). Serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, C-reactive protein (CRP) and endotoxin levels were measured following surgery and hearts were preserved for histological and molecular analyses. Conclusions: Our data show promising insights to a beneficial role of pro-biotic administration in relation to metabolic changes in mice and the acute inflammatory response.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleImpact of Pro-Biotic Administration on an Acute Coronary Eventen_US
dc.creatorRegan, Jessica Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorRegan, Jessica Annen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAims: Recent studies have suggested promising health benefits for pro-biotics in humans. Most of these studies focus on the advantages of pro-biotics in relation to immune function, but little has been done to evaluate the impact of pro-biotics on inflammatory response and cardiovascular health. In the present study we investigated the impact of pro-biotic administration on mice prior to and following an acute coronary event. Methods and Results: We compared male mice on high-fat or normal diet that were gavaged for 4 weeks with a B. lactis strain of probiotic or with saline for control. Mice were then subjected to myocardial infarction or sham surgery. Mice administered B. lactis were found to have an attenuated weight gain on both high-fat and normal diet compared to saline controls. Mice treated with B. lactis displayed an infarct area of 10.5±3.0%, which is significantly less (p<0.01) than the infarct area of saline treated mice (29.5±4.7%). Serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, C-reactive protein (CRP) and endotoxin levels were measured following surgery and hearts were preserved for histological and molecular analyses. Conclusions: Our data show promising insights to a beneficial role of pro-biotic administration in relation to metabolic changes in mice and the acute inflammatory response.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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