Female Philopatry in the Comca'ac Community of Punta Chueca, Sonora, Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244512
Title:
Female Philopatry in the Comca'ac Community of Punta Chueca, Sonora, Mexico
Author:
Perry, Amber Lynne
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper concerns the study of sex-biased dispersal patterns as related to genealogical and geographical distribution in the Native American, Comca'ac Community of Punta Chueca, Sonora, Mexico. The Comca'ac Community is an isolate community that exemplifies the conditions of being both spatially and temporally structured around a prescribed relational system, which are desirable conditions for research on kin-structured communities. Agricultural communities are typically patrilocal and follow the trend of female-biased dispersal while hunter-gatherer societies follow the trend of matrilocality about equally often and favor male-biased dispersal. Industrialized communities have yet to be accurately classified as demonstrating a definite male-biased dispersal pattern, female-biased dispersal pattern, or neither as it is a continuously evolving society of relative instability. As the Comca'ac have refused to incorporate agriculture into their economy and proven to be a traditional, nonindustrialized community, it was predicted that they would be patterned after a matrilocal community that exhibits male-biased dispersal. By collecting genealogical (degrees of genetic relatedness) and geographical (location of households) data of the Comca'ac, local kin densities were calculated of the mother and father of the offspring of the community to support the hypothesis of the Comca'ac Community as a matrilocal community with a strong pattern of female philopatry. B.S.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFemale Philopatry in the Comca'ac Community of Punta Chueca, Sonora, Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorPerry, Amber Lynneen_US
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Amber Lynneen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper concerns the study of sex-biased dispersal patterns as related to genealogical and geographical distribution in the Native American, Comca'ac Community of Punta Chueca, Sonora, Mexico. The Comca'ac Community is an isolate community that exemplifies the conditions of being both spatially and temporally structured around a prescribed relational system, which are desirable conditions for research on kin-structured communities. Agricultural communities are typically patrilocal and follow the trend of female-biased dispersal while hunter-gatherer societies follow the trend of matrilocality about equally often and favor male-biased dispersal. Industrialized communities have yet to be accurately classified as demonstrating a definite male-biased dispersal pattern, female-biased dispersal pattern, or neither as it is a continuously evolving society of relative instability. As the Comca'ac have refused to incorporate agriculture into their economy and proven to be a traditional, nonindustrialized community, it was predicted that they would be patterned after a matrilocal community that exhibits male-biased dispersal. By collecting genealogical (degrees of genetic relatedness) and geographical (location of households) data of the Comca'ac, local kin densities were calculated of the mother and father of the offspring of the community to support the hypothesis of the Comca'ac Community as a matrilocal community with a strong pattern of female philopatry. B.S.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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