Lost in Translation: Medical Translation between the United States and Japan

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244492
Title:
Lost in Translation: Medical Translation between the United States and Japan
Author:
Milder, Caitlin Michelle
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the still-developing global medical community of the 21st century, the need for translation is rapidly becoming a prominent field. Therefore, I oriented my thesis around this task. After a semester of work on an English-Japanese medical translation, a Japanese medical translator informed me my work was difficult to comprehend. Curiosity drove me to determine what I could do to pursue a more successful translation in the future. This report begins with an analysis of the medical evolution of America and Japan and a comparison of the two medical histories. It explains the current medical culture in both nations with an example of how one medical case is perceived differently by doctors from each country. Through an analysis of translation, it concludes that translation is only possible into one’s native language, and that one must have a background in translation to attempt the task. It integrates the above aspects to express the explicit difficulties of medical translation, acknowledging that a translator must not only understand the languages but the cultures of each country to achieve a working translation. Finally, it explains that through research, practice, and translation only into English, I can accomplish successful translations in the future.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLost in Translation: Medical Translation between the United States and Japanen_US
dc.creatorMilder, Caitlin Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilder, Caitlin Michelleen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the still-developing global medical community of the 21st century, the need for translation is rapidly becoming a prominent field. Therefore, I oriented my thesis around this task. After a semester of work on an English-Japanese medical translation, a Japanese medical translator informed me my work was difficult to comprehend. Curiosity drove me to determine what I could do to pursue a more successful translation in the future. This report begins with an analysis of the medical evolution of America and Japan and a comparison of the two medical histories. It explains the current medical culture in both nations with an example of how one medical case is perceived differently by doctors from each country. Through an analysis of translation, it concludes that translation is only possible into one’s native language, and that one must have a background in translation to attempt the task. It integrates the above aspects to express the explicit difficulties of medical translation, acknowledging that a translator must not only understand the languages but the cultures of each country to achieve a working translation. Finally, it explains that through research, practice, and translation only into English, I can accomplish successful translations in the future.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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