Improving Our Immigration Court System: Analyzing the Effects of Immigration Reform for the United States Courts of Appeals

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244491
Title:
Improving Our Immigration Court System: Analyzing the Effects of Immigration Reform for the United States Courts of Appeals
Author:
Mercer, Elizabeth Ann
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The United States immigration system is challenged by a case backlog that plagues the ability for our courts to quickly and fairly adjudicate immigration cases and appeals. With over 275,000 immigration cases awaiting trial, there have been a number of ways in which scholars and policy-makers propose that the courts alleviate this issue. Although there have been constitutional challenges against the way our immigration court system adjudicates its hearings and appeals, the U.S. Courts of Appeals has continued to provide the oversight necessary in making sure that due process has been met. This paper provides a comprehensive look at the judicial structure of immigration cases. It explores the procedural problems with the Immigration Courts, the Board of Immigration Appeals, and the U.S Courts of Appeals, as well as addresses the streamlining changes affecting this the immigration court system starting in 1999. It identifies multiple court cases in which the U.S. Courts of Appeals has provided oversight in assuring that court practices do not breach an alien’s due process. Although there is no clear-cut solution to address the burdening backlog of cases, an Article I Immigration Court would be the most viable solution we have to fix our immigration court problems.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleImproving Our Immigration Court System: Analyzing the Effects of Immigration Reform for the United States Courts of Appealsen_US
dc.creatorMercer, Elizabeth Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Elizabeth Annen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States immigration system is challenged by a case backlog that plagues the ability for our courts to quickly and fairly adjudicate immigration cases and appeals. With over 275,000 immigration cases awaiting trial, there have been a number of ways in which scholars and policy-makers propose that the courts alleviate this issue. Although there have been constitutional challenges against the way our immigration court system adjudicates its hearings and appeals, the U.S. Courts of Appeals has continued to provide the oversight necessary in making sure that due process has been met. This paper provides a comprehensive look at the judicial structure of immigration cases. It explores the procedural problems with the Immigration Courts, the Board of Immigration Appeals, and the U.S Courts of Appeals, as well as addresses the streamlining changes affecting this the immigration court system starting in 1999. It identifies multiple court cases in which the U.S. Courts of Appeals has provided oversight in assuring that court practices do not breach an alien’s due process. Although there is no clear-cut solution to address the burdening backlog of cases, an Article I Immigration Court would be the most viable solution we have to fix our immigration court problems.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.