Patriarchy, Patriotutes, and the Panopticon in Tourneur's Cat People

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244489
Title:
Patriarchy, Patriotutes, and the Panopticon in Tourneur's Cat People
Author:
Prasad, Pritha
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Jacques Toumeur's 1942 film Cat People reflects patriarchal America's anxieties regarding the workplace inversion of gender roles during World War II. However, since the film was released in the middle of the war, it could not quite discourage women from assuming jobs; after all, working women were vital to maintaining the economy. In this paper, I uncover the complicated and previously overlooked relationships between gendered wartime discourse and Cat People, revealing how the film puts forth an ideological imperative in an attempt to "discipline" the women of its historical moment. Using the works of René Girard, Lucia Folena, Teresa de Lauretis, and Michel Foucault, I argue that Cat People - besides working to ensure the cultural resonance of male dominance during a time when it was seemingly under attack - rehearses an important process by which patriarchal society often explains cultural collapse: the scapegoating of female sexuality.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; English and Creative Writing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePatriarchy, Patriotutes, and the Panopticon in Tourneur's Cat Peopleen_US
dc.creatorPrasad, Prithaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrasad, Prithaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractJacques Toumeur's 1942 film Cat People reflects patriarchal America's anxieties regarding the workplace inversion of gender roles during World War II. However, since the film was released in the middle of the war, it could not quite discourage women from assuming jobs; after all, working women were vital to maintaining the economy. In this paper, I uncover the complicated and previously overlooked relationships between gendered wartime discourse and Cat People, revealing how the film puts forth an ideological imperative in an attempt to "discipline" the women of its historical moment. Using the works of René Girard, Lucia Folena, Teresa de Lauretis, and Michel Foucault, I argue that Cat People - besides working to ensure the cultural resonance of male dominance during a time when it was seemingly under attack - rehearses an important process by which patriarchal society often explains cultural collapse: the scapegoating of female sexuality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish and Creative Writingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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