The Gendered Geographies of Justice in Transition: A Feminist Geopolitics Perspective

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244487
Title:
The Gendered Geographies of Justice in Transition: A Feminist Geopolitics Perspective
Author:
Patterson-Markowitz, Rebecca Alexander; Marston, Sallie; Oglesby, Elizabeth
Issue Date:
18-Sep-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper explores the often-undervalued role of gender in transitional justice mechanisms and the importance of women's struggles and agency in that regard. We focus on the efforts of the women's movement in Guatemala to address questions of justice and healing for survivors of gendered violence during Guatemala's 36-year internal armed conflict. We show how the initial transitional justice measures visibilizing gender were taken up by the women’s movement, and how their endeavors to further visibilize sexual violence as a war crime committed in the context of a genocide have resulted in notable interventions in historical memory and justice. After the signing of Guatemala's 1996 peace accords, two truth commissions detailed the events of the internal armed conflict. Sexual violence was documented and analyzed in these transitional justice reports, which recognized the differentiated impacts of the conflict on men and women. In the subsequent fifteen years, sectors of the Guatemalan women's movement called for justice for survivors of sexual violence during the armed conflict. In their work with survivors, women's organizations have utilized the preliminary documentation of sexual violence in the truth commission reports to support and further their pursuit of justice. They have gone beyond the findings of these initial commissions to conduct a broader analysis of the violence committed against women in the conflict within a feminist framework. This struggle has opened an important space for dialogue in post-conflict Guatemala and seeks to ensure that women survivors will be rewarded some measure of justice and the opportunity of healing.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Interdisciplinary Studies and International Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Gendered Geographies of Justice in Transition: A Feminist Geopolitics Perspectiveen_US
dc.creatorPatterson-Markowitz, Rebecca Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatterson-Markowitz, Rebecca Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarston, Sallieen_US
dc.contributor.authorOglesby, Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2012-09-18-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the often-undervalued role of gender in transitional justice mechanisms and the importance of women's struggles and agency in that regard. We focus on the efforts of the women's movement in Guatemala to address questions of justice and healing for survivors of gendered violence during Guatemala's 36-year internal armed conflict. We show how the initial transitional justice measures visibilizing gender were taken up by the women’s movement, and how their endeavors to further visibilize sexual violence as a war crime committed in the context of a genocide have resulted in notable interventions in historical memory and justice. After the signing of Guatemala's 1996 peace accords, two truth commissions detailed the events of the internal armed conflict. Sexual violence was documented and analyzed in these transitional justice reports, which recognized the differentiated impacts of the conflict on men and women. In the subsequent fifteen years, sectors of the Guatemalan women's movement called for justice for survivors of sexual violence during the armed conflict. In their work with survivors, women's organizations have utilized the preliminary documentation of sexual violence in the truth commission reports to support and further their pursuit of justice. They have gone beyond the findings of these initial commissions to conduct a broader analysis of the violence committed against women in the conflict within a feminist framework. This struggle has opened an important space for dialogue in post-conflict Guatemala and seeks to ensure that women survivors will be rewarded some measure of justice and the opportunity of healing.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary Studies and International Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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