Assessing the Potential of Hztransip as a Genetic Drive in Anopheles Mosquitoes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244486
Title:
Assessing the Potential of Hztransip as a Genetic Drive in Anopheles Mosquitoes
Author:
Park, Yong Soo
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Malaria kills millions of people across the globe and measures to control this disease are not simple and definite. While anti-malarial effector genes have been identified and successfully engineered into the human malaria vector, Anopheles mosquitoes, a mechanism to drive these genes through wild Anopheles populations is needed. This study utilizes and assesses the Hztransib transposable element from Helicoverpazea as a potential candidate for the genetic drive mechanism. Specifically, this study tries to determine whether Hztransib is capable of duplicating and remobilizing the effector within the germ line of the Anopheles mosquitoes. To do that a helper line of DsRed representing Transib transgenic line is crossed with the ECFP/EYFP donor line. The progeny from this cross (G1 progeny) is examined for the eye expression of ECFP, EYFP and DsRed. Positive DsRed/ECFP/EYFP are then mated with wild-type mosquitoes and a large sample of individual progeny (G2 progeny) is screened for the expression of DsRed, EYFP and ECFP markers to determine the transpositional activity from Hztransib. The results from G2 progeny screens showed only Mendelian crossings suggesting that Hztransib might have been silenced or not sufficiently activated in the mosquito germ line.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAssessing the Potential of Hztransip as a Genetic Drive in Anopheles Mosquitoesen_US
dc.creatorPark, Yong Sooen_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Yong Sooen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMalaria kills millions of people across the globe and measures to control this disease are not simple and definite. While anti-malarial effector genes have been identified and successfully engineered into the human malaria vector, Anopheles mosquitoes, a mechanism to drive these genes through wild Anopheles populations is needed. This study utilizes and assesses the Hztransib transposable element from Helicoverpazea as a potential candidate for the genetic drive mechanism. Specifically, this study tries to determine whether Hztransib is capable of duplicating and remobilizing the effector within the germ line of the Anopheles mosquitoes. To do that a helper line of DsRed representing Transib transgenic line is crossed with the ECFP/EYFP donor line. The progeny from this cross (G1 progeny) is examined for the eye expression of ECFP, EYFP and DsRed. Positive DsRed/ECFP/EYFP are then mated with wild-type mosquitoes and a large sample of individual progeny (G2 progeny) is screened for the expression of DsRed, EYFP and ECFP markers to determine the transpositional activity from Hztransib. The results from G2 progeny screens showed only Mendelian crossings suggesting that Hztransib might have been silenced or not sufficiently activated in the mosquito germ line.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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