Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244484
Title:
Attachment Theory and Reasons Not to Marry Among Emerging Adults
Author:
Palomer, Angela Mayo
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Using attachment theory, I examined reasons for not marrying, including doubts about the self and doubts about the partner, among emerging adults (N = 89; age range 18‐25). To explain these reasons for not marrying, I used attachment theory to examine attachment dimensions: avoidance (positive view of self; negative view of others) and anxiety (negative view of self; positive view of others). Also from attachment theory, I examined reports of parental divorce, given its associations with relational struggles. I hypothesized that individuals: 1) higher on anxiety will have more reasons not to marry based on doubts about self, whereas individuals higher on avoidance will have more reasons not to marry based on doubts about their partner and; 2) experiencing parental divorce will have more overall reasons not to marry than individuals not reporting parental divorce. Using proc mixed and a t‐test to examine each hypothesis respectively, I found that neither hypothesis was supported. I conclude that attachment dimensions during emerging adulthood are not associated with marital behaviors at this life stage. Further, parental divorce is not associated with reasons not to marry, likely given unequal sample sizes (n = 20 reported parental divorce; n = 69 reported no parental divorce).
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Family Studies and Human Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAttachment Theory and Reasons Not to Marry Among Emerging Adultsen_US
dc.creatorPalomer, Angela Mayoen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalomer, Angela Mayoen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing attachment theory, I examined reasons for not marrying, including doubts about the self and doubts about the partner, among emerging adults (N = 89; age range 18‐25). To explain these reasons for not marrying, I used attachment theory to examine attachment dimensions: avoidance (positive view of self; negative view of others) and anxiety (negative view of self; positive view of others). Also from attachment theory, I examined reports of parental divorce, given its associations with relational struggles. I hypothesized that individuals: 1) higher on anxiety will have more reasons not to marry based on doubts about self, whereas individuals higher on avoidance will have more reasons not to marry based on doubts about their partner and; 2) experiencing parental divorce will have more overall reasons not to marry than individuals not reporting parental divorce. Using proc mixed and a t‐test to examine each hypothesis respectively, I found that neither hypothesis was supported. I conclude that attachment dimensions during emerging adulthood are not associated with marital behaviors at this life stage. Further, parental divorce is not associated with reasons not to marry, likely given unequal sample sizes (n = 20 reported parental divorce; n = 69 reported no parental divorce).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily Studies and Human Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.