Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244483
Title:
PEDF Modulation of Schlemm's Canal Barrier Function
Author:
Niere, Shannon Marie
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Purpose: The role of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in glaucoma is unknown. There is a higher risk of glaucoma among people of African descent, also the reason for which is unknown. The goal of this study was to measure and compare levels of PEDF in human aqueous humor from Caucasians and African Americans and examine PEDF effects on the permeability of Schlemm’s Canal (SC) endothelia, part of the blood-aqueous barrier. Methods: Eight African American and 10 Caucasian aqueous humor samples were assayed for PEDF using ELISA. SC cells plated at confluence on Transwell filters were exposed to human retinal pigment epithelia media or purified PEDF and assayed for transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) using an ohmmeter at 0, 24, and 48 hour time points. Results: PEDF levels in aqueous humor were detected in 14/18 samples, ranging from non detectible levels to 374.11ng/ml. PEDF maintained net TEER of human SC endothelial monolayers from 11 ± 2 to 10.16 ± 3.31Ωcm² in hRPE media (3.38ng/mL) and 13.7 ± 0.6 to 15.7±0.6Ωcm2 in purified PEDF (1μg/mL). Conclusions: There is no statistically significant relationship between PEDF content and race of donor for aqueous humor. PEDF increases and stabilizes resistance in SC and has an effect on the blood-aqueous barrier.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePEDF Modulation of Schlemm's Canal Barrier Functionen_US
dc.creatorNiere, Shannon Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorNiere, Shannon Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The role of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in glaucoma is unknown. There is a higher risk of glaucoma among people of African descent, also the reason for which is unknown. The goal of this study was to measure and compare levels of PEDF in human aqueous humor from Caucasians and African Americans and examine PEDF effects on the permeability of Schlemm’s Canal (SC) endothelia, part of the blood-aqueous barrier. Methods: Eight African American and 10 Caucasian aqueous humor samples were assayed for PEDF using ELISA. SC cells plated at confluence on Transwell filters were exposed to human retinal pigment epithelia media or purified PEDF and assayed for transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) using an ohmmeter at 0, 24, and 48 hour time points. Results: PEDF levels in aqueous humor were detected in 14/18 samples, ranging from non detectible levels to 374.11ng/ml. PEDF maintained net TEER of human SC endothelial monolayers from 11 ± 2 to 10.16 ± 3.31Ωcm² in hRPE media (3.38ng/mL) and 13.7 ± 0.6 to 15.7±0.6Ωcm2 in purified PEDF (1μg/mL). Conclusions: There is no statistically significant relationship between PEDF content and race of donor for aqueous humor. PEDF increases and stabilizes resistance in SC and has an effect on the blood-aqueous barrier.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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