Dean's Innovation Challenge: Researching the Marketability of Turnable Fourier Transform Spectropolarimeter in Southern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244473
Title:
Dean's Innovation Challenge: Researching the Marketability of Turnable Fourier Transform Spectropolarimeter in Southern Arizona
Author:
Meglio, James Joseph; Bednarski, Marcin; Rojany, Ron
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Through various primary and secondary research methods, a University of Arizona technology from the Optics Department was analyzed in terms of new venture viability and sustainability in Southern Arizona. Tunable Fourier Transform Spectropolarimeter (TFTS) has applications in military, biology and astronomy by using polarization to distinguish different objects such as cancer cells. The technology measures details of how an object within an image can change the polarization of light compared to how other object in that same image changes the polarization. Innovative aspects of the technology include tenability, achromaticity and the bandwidth size. The technology however only worked in a laboratory setting and further development was ceased due to lack of funding and interest from outside investor groups. Primary data sources included the inventor (Dr. Dereniak), the lead optics licensor (Amy Phillips), cancer center employees (Dr. Bartels, Mr. Yozwiak), and patent application. Secondary sources included, but not limited to, informational databases, medical journals, optical journals, office of technology transfer, and small business innovation research. Based on information gathered and consulting work, two recommendations were presented to increase the likelihood of the University benefiting from innovation: *Addition of an Innovation Fund to yearly Tucson conference called Idea Funding. Innovation Fund is a $50,000 prize for the most promising technology based on detailed criteria. Along with the prize, remaining competitors would receive needed exposure to increase funding possibility. *Creation of a research funding position at the Office of Technology Transfer. It would be the duty of this employee to research and aid in the grant application process for all of the technologies at the OTT.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Accounting and Entrepreneurship
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDean's Innovation Challenge: Researching the Marketability of Turnable Fourier Transform Spectropolarimeter in Southern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorMeglio, James Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeglio, James Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorBednarski, Marcinen_US
dc.contributor.authorRojany, Ronen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThrough various primary and secondary research methods, a University of Arizona technology from the Optics Department was analyzed in terms of new venture viability and sustainability in Southern Arizona. Tunable Fourier Transform Spectropolarimeter (TFTS) has applications in military, biology and astronomy by using polarization to distinguish different objects such as cancer cells. The technology measures details of how an object within an image can change the polarization of light compared to how other object in that same image changes the polarization. Innovative aspects of the technology include tenability, achromaticity and the bandwidth size. The technology however only worked in a laboratory setting and further development was ceased due to lack of funding and interest from outside investor groups. Primary data sources included the inventor (Dr. Dereniak), the lead optics licensor (Amy Phillips), cancer center employees (Dr. Bartels, Mr. Yozwiak), and patent application. Secondary sources included, but not limited to, informational databases, medical journals, optical journals, office of technology transfer, and small business innovation research. Based on information gathered and consulting work, two recommendations were presented to increase the likelihood of the University benefiting from innovation: *Addition of an Innovation Fund to yearly Tucson conference called Idea Funding. Innovation Fund is a $50,000 prize for the most promising technology based on detailed criteria. Along with the prize, remaining competitors would receive needed exposure to increase funding possibility. *Creation of a research funding position at the Office of Technology Transfer. It would be the duty of this employee to research and aid in the grant application process for all of the technologies at the OTT.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.B.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAccounting and Entrepreneurshipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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