"Where Mind Struggles with Mind": Chess and the Problem of Consciousness in Poe and Bierce

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244455
Title:
"Where Mind Struggles with Mind": Chess and the Problem of Consciousness in Poe and Bierce
Author:
Mateer, Amanda Rae
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Edgar Allan Poe and Ambrose Bierce write about chess-playing automatons. Both writers utilize the game of chess due to its special connection to artificial intelligence. Chess has an inherent left-right dichotomy due to the asymmetrical structure of the chessboard and the placement of the king in relationship to a player‘s left or right hand. This dichotomy helps to introduce several other binaries seen in "Maelzel‘s Chess Player" and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" by Poe as well as "Moxon's Master" by Bierce. Each work leads to the vital question of whether automatons, or machines, have the capability to think, and how and why chess is significant to answering this question. The binaries of the master-slave relationship and the idea of consciousness and non-consciousness shape these works. Although modern-day computers have the ability to beat humans at chess, the consciousness and the true ability of these machines is widely debated. These literary examples shed light as to why and how chess is critical to showing the adversarial dimensions of artificial intelligence and human consciousness.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.title"Where Mind Struggles with Mind": Chess and the Problem of Consciousness in Poe and Bierceen_US
dc.creatorMateer, Amanda Raeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMateer, Amanda Raeen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEdgar Allan Poe and Ambrose Bierce write about chess-playing automatons. Both writers utilize the game of chess due to its special connection to artificial intelligence. Chess has an inherent left-right dichotomy due to the asymmetrical structure of the chessboard and the placement of the king in relationship to a player‘s left or right hand. This dichotomy helps to introduce several other binaries seen in "Maelzel‘s Chess Player" and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" by Poe as well as "Moxon's Master" by Bierce. Each work leads to the vital question of whether automatons, or machines, have the capability to think, and how and why chess is significant to answering this question. The binaries of the master-slave relationship and the idea of consciousness and non-consciousness shape these works. Although modern-day computers have the ability to beat humans at chess, the consciousness and the true ability of these machines is widely debated. These literary examples shed light as to why and how chess is critical to showing the adversarial dimensions of artificial intelligence and human consciousness.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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