Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244451
Title:
Public Perceptions of Income Inequality in Latin America
Author:
Mangal, Kunal
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis explores the ways in which public opinion on income inequality is shaped in Latin America. The central argument is that the key to understanding public discontent lies in shifting attention from "differences in income" to "differences in ability to achieve things one has reason to value because of one's position in the income distribution." That is, two countries that appear the same in the former dimension may look entirely different in the latter - and I provide examples from Latin America to illustrate. I maintain that Latin Americans believe the inequality in their countries is too high not just because of the shape of the income distribution, but also because factors besides income - such as the provision of public goods, the strength of institutions, and cultural norms - exacerbate the impact that those income gaps have in people’s lives. Lastly, I explore the factors that may be most responsible for driving the changes in public perception of inequality in Argentina over time. The evidence hints at the possibility that Argentines may be confusing poverty with inequality.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; International Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePublic Perceptions of Income Inequality in Latin Americaen_US
dc.creatorMangal, Kunalen_US
dc.contributor.authorMangal, Kunalen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the ways in which public opinion on income inequality is shaped in Latin America. The central argument is that the key to understanding public discontent lies in shifting attention from "differences in income" to "differences in ability to achieve things one has reason to value because of one's position in the income distribution." That is, two countries that appear the same in the former dimension may look entirely different in the latter - and I provide examples from Latin America to illustrate. I maintain that Latin Americans believe the inequality in their countries is too high not just because of the shape of the income distribution, but also because factors besides income - such as the provision of public goods, the strength of institutions, and cultural norms - exacerbate the impact that those income gaps have in people’s lives. Lastly, I explore the factors that may be most responsible for driving the changes in public perception of inequality in Argentina over time. The evidence hints at the possibility that Argentines may be confusing poverty with inequality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.