Regional Shifts in Brazilian Sugarcane Production: Why Sugarcane Migrated South

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244414
Title:
Regional Shifts in Brazilian Sugarcane Production: Why Sugarcane Migrated South
Author:
García, Francisco Lara
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Brazilian experiment with sugar cane began in Northeastern Brazil during the earliest days of the colonial period. Its cultivation followed the extension of the Portuguese Royal Authority to the present day state of Bahia and the founding of the city of Salvador in 1549. Salvador Bahia became the center of a very complex production and commercialization system that supplies sugar to regional, national and international markets. In 1980, Brazil overtook India as the top global sugarcane producer, title which it holds to this day. Sugar cane’s versatility as a sweetener and a source of ethanol propelled its comeback to the helm of sugarcane producers. . Some of this success is due to the Brazilian government’s support for viable fuel alternatives following the oil shocks of 1973. Naturally, one would assume that in its pursuit to recapture the world market Brazil would have relied on the Northeast’s tradition in sugar production. The statistics, however, indicate that sometime in the 1960s a regional shift occurred. São Paulo is now the leader in sugar production. My research examines the question of how the Northeastern region lost its leadership to São Paulo, a state without any significant history in sugar production. For this research, I employ a mixed-methods approach. I combine historical production data from several reputable governmental and private sources with information compiled during in-depth literature review and an interview with an individual knowledgeable about the circumstances of the local sugar industry. I examine the role that environment, globalization, and technological advances have played in the regional shift of Brazil’s sugar production.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRegional Shifts in Brazilian Sugarcane Production: Why Sugarcane Migrated Southen_US
dc.creatorGarcía, Francisco Laraen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarcía, Francisco Laraen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Brazilian experiment with sugar cane began in Northeastern Brazil during the earliest days of the colonial period. Its cultivation followed the extension of the Portuguese Royal Authority to the present day state of Bahia and the founding of the city of Salvador in 1549. Salvador Bahia became the center of a very complex production and commercialization system that supplies sugar to regional, national and international markets. In 1980, Brazil overtook India as the top global sugarcane producer, title which it holds to this day. Sugar cane’s versatility as a sweetener and a source of ethanol propelled its comeback to the helm of sugarcane producers. . Some of this success is due to the Brazilian government’s support for viable fuel alternatives following the oil shocks of 1973. Naturally, one would assume that in its pursuit to recapture the world market Brazil would have relied on the Northeast’s tradition in sugar production. The statistics, however, indicate that sometime in the 1960s a regional shift occurred. São Paulo is now the leader in sugar production. My research examines the question of how the Northeastern region lost its leadership to São Paulo, a state without any significant history in sugar production. For this research, I employ a mixed-methods approach. I combine historical production data from several reputable governmental and private sources with information compiled during in-depth literature review and an interview with an individual knowledgeable about the circumstances of the local sugar industry. I examine the role that environment, globalization, and technological advances have played in the regional shift of Brazil’s sugar production.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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