Divorce-Related Psychological Adjustment Moderates the Association between Sleep and Systiolic Blood Pressure Over 90 Days in Women

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244413
Title:
Divorce-Related Psychological Adjustment Moderates the Association between Sleep and Systiolic Blood Pressure Over 90 Days in Women
Author:
Krietsch, Kendra
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigates changes in resting blood pressure (BP) as a function of psychological distress and sleep disturbance over 90 days in recently divorced adults. Marital separation and divorce are associated with increases in self-reported sleep disturbance, distress, and negative health outcomes. However, few studies have investigated the interactive effect of psychological adjustment and biologically relevant health processes on specific health measures. Seventy eight recently separated or divorced community-dwelling adults (n = 25 men) completed self-report measures of divorce-related distress and sleep disturbance prior to a laboratory visit. During the laboratory visit, BP was assessed over 4 minutes. BP was assessed in an identical fashion 90 days later. Analysis revealed that an interactive effect between self-reported distress and sleep disturbance was significant for SBP in women only, after accounting for relationship and health-relevant factors. Among women who reported greater (+ 1 SD) psychological distress, those who reported greater (+lSD) sleep disturbance evidenced significantly greater increases in SBP than those who reported less (-1 SD) sleep disturbance. These findings suggest that for women experiencing greater distress following divorce, sleep may either be a protective factor that ameliorates the negative effects of stress on health, or an aggravating factor that exacerbates these effects.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDivorce-Related Psychological Adjustment Moderates the Association between Sleep and Systiolic Blood Pressure Over 90 Days in Womenen_US
dc.creatorKrietsch, Kendraen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrietsch, Kendraen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates changes in resting blood pressure (BP) as a function of psychological distress and sleep disturbance over 90 days in recently divorced adults. Marital separation and divorce are associated with increases in self-reported sleep disturbance, distress, and negative health outcomes. However, few studies have investigated the interactive effect of psychological adjustment and biologically relevant health processes on specific health measures. Seventy eight recently separated or divorced community-dwelling adults (n = 25 men) completed self-report measures of divorce-related distress and sleep disturbance prior to a laboratory visit. During the laboratory visit, BP was assessed over 4 minutes. BP was assessed in an identical fashion 90 days later. Analysis revealed that an interactive effect between self-reported distress and sleep disturbance was significant for SBP in women only, after accounting for relationship and health-relevant factors. Among women who reported greater (+ 1 SD) psychological distress, those who reported greater (+lSD) sleep disturbance evidenced significantly greater increases in SBP than those who reported less (-1 SD) sleep disturbance. These findings suggest that for women experiencing greater distress following divorce, sleep may either be a protective factor that ameliorates the negative effects of stress on health, or an aggravating factor that exacerbates these effects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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