Autonomous Soaring Techniques for Application to Small Scale Unmanned Gliders

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244398
Title:
Autonomous Soaring Techniques for Application to Small Scale Unmanned Gliders
Author:
Kaplan, Nikolas A.; Grusenmeyer, Christopher R.; Jones, Daniel W.
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Soaring is an action that can be readily seen in nature. Birds have long been known to stay aloft by using the naturally occurring lift sources generated in the environment. These sources, such as thermals and terrain fluctuations, create a region of up-drafting air which affords a natural increase in the lift produced by wings. Utilizing these environmental lift sources has great technical advantage. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are limited in range only by their power source; whether that may be battery or fuel, the UAV will eventually need to land to recharge its energy source. Due to limited payload constraints, UAVs often are implemented in short-range and low-endurance missions. These constraints can be relaxed significantly if the UAV is capable of autonomously extracting this energy from the environment. Accomplishing this task requires advanced control algorithms which are capable of executing decision making strategies to cope with the uncertain variability of the environment. This project will address the need for this system as well as experimentally show its application via computer aided simulation and radio controlled model flight testing using an autopilot on board the aircraft.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.A.E.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Aerospace Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAutonomous Soaring Techniques for Application to Small Scale Unmanned Glidersen_US
dc.creatorKaplan, Nikolas A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaplan, Nikolas A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrusenmeyer, Christopher R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Daniel W.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSoaring is an action that can be readily seen in nature. Birds have long been known to stay aloft by using the naturally occurring lift sources generated in the environment. These sources, such as thermals and terrain fluctuations, create a region of up-drafting air which affords a natural increase in the lift produced by wings. Utilizing these environmental lift sources has great technical advantage. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are limited in range only by their power source; whether that may be battery or fuel, the UAV will eventually need to land to recharge its energy source. Due to limited payload constraints, UAVs often are implemented in short-range and low-endurance missions. These constraints can be relaxed significantly if the UAV is capable of autonomously extracting this energy from the environment. Accomplishing this task requires advanced control algorithms which are capable of executing decision making strategies to cope with the uncertain variability of the environment. This project will address the need for this system as well as experimentally show its application via computer aided simulation and radio controlled model flight testing using an autopilot on board the aircraft.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.A.E.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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