The Effects of Endohyphal Bacteria on Anti-Cancer and Anti-Malaria Metabolites of Endophytic Fungi

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/244395
Title:
The Effects of Endohyphal Bacteria on Anti-Cancer and Anti-Malaria Metabolites of Endophytic Fungi
Author:
Jung, Chan; Arnold, A. Elizabeth
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Endophytes - the diverse, ubiquitous microbes that inhabit healthy plant tissues-- have proven to play a promising role in advancements in medicine due to their bioactivity against many pathogenic agents- such as bacteria, cancer cell lines, and malarial parasites. Based on preliminary data, endohyphal bacteria that have been found to inhabit certain endophytes may affect their metabolite production. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether diverse bioactive endophytes harbor endohyphal bacteria, which frequently are fastidious and can’t be cultured independently. A molecular cloning approach, through which two PCR enzyme mixes were compared, revealed that 1 out of 14 bioactive endophytes screened was positive for endohyphal bacteria (7.14%). BLAST analysis of 16s rRNA sequence data indicated a top match to the genus Caulobacter, a Gram-negative genus of bacteria commonly found in soil and water. Previous work by colleagues has found related strains of endohyphal bacteria in other strains of endophytes, which brings attention to this particular bacterium in assessing endohyphal bacteria and their ecological roles. Further testing of endophytes immediately after isolation from plant tissue, rather than from long-term vouchers, might be more effective in documenting endohyphal bacteria. For those that do harbor detectable infections, curing the endophytes of their endohyphal bacteria then assessing their metabolic activity would reveal whether or not the bacteria plays a major role for metabolite production and efficiency of endophytes against pathogens.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Endohyphal Bacteria on Anti-Cancer and Anti-Malaria Metabolites of Endophytic Fungien_US
dc.creatorJung, Chanen_US
dc.contributor.authorJung, Chanen_US
dc.contributor.authorArnold, A. Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEndophytes - the diverse, ubiquitous microbes that inhabit healthy plant tissues-- have proven to play a promising role in advancements in medicine due to their bioactivity against many pathogenic agents- such as bacteria, cancer cell lines, and malarial parasites. Based on preliminary data, endohyphal bacteria that have been found to inhabit certain endophytes may affect their metabolite production. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether diverse bioactive endophytes harbor endohyphal bacteria, which frequently are fastidious and can’t be cultured independently. A molecular cloning approach, through which two PCR enzyme mixes were compared, revealed that 1 out of 14 bioactive endophytes screened was positive for endohyphal bacteria (7.14%). BLAST analysis of 16s rRNA sequence data indicated a top match to the genus Caulobacter, a Gram-negative genus of bacteria commonly found in soil and water. Previous work by colleagues has found related strains of endohyphal bacteria in other strains of endophytes, which brings attention to this particular bacterium in assessing endohyphal bacteria and their ecological roles. Further testing of endophytes immediately after isolation from plant tissue, rather than from long-term vouchers, might be more effective in documenting endohyphal bacteria. For those that do harbor detectable infections, curing the endophytes of their endohyphal bacteria then assessing their metabolic activity would reveal whether or not the bacteria plays a major role for metabolite production and efficiency of endophytes against pathogens.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.