Implementing Human Resources Best Practices in Volunteer Selection

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243977
Title:
Implementing Human Resources Best Practices in Volunteer Selection
Author:
Johnson, Karen Anne
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
While human resource best practices have been proven to reduce turnover and absenteeism and increase employee satisfaction and productivity, many nonprofits neglect this realm of volunteer management. Specifically, volunteer selection is a field that has been given little discussion in the context of volunteer management strategies. Through my research, I discovered that some volunteer roles are very similar to paid positions and thus may benefit from rigorous selection methods. While nonprofits that utilize a larger number of low skill or episodic volunteer may not find it worthwhile to screen volunteers, organizations that serve vulnerable populations and rely heavily on volunteers should consider implementing human resource best practices by requiring a volunteer selection process. Such screening methods might test for volunteer success predictors such as reliability and dependability. Nonprofits may find that the most effective and efficient volunteer screening tools are application blanks and structured interviews. By focusing more on volunteer selection, nonprofits may be able to ensure that they are fostering a long term partnership with the highest quality potential volunteers.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Business Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleImplementing Human Resources Best Practices in Volunteer Selectionen_US
dc.creatorJohnson, Karen Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Karen Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile human resource best practices have been proven to reduce turnover and absenteeism and increase employee satisfaction and productivity, many nonprofits neglect this realm of volunteer management. Specifically, volunteer selection is a field that has been given little discussion in the context of volunteer management strategies. Through my research, I discovered that some volunteer roles are very similar to paid positions and thus may benefit from rigorous selection methods. While nonprofits that utilize a larger number of low skill or episodic volunteer may not find it worthwhile to screen volunteers, organizations that serve vulnerable populations and rely heavily on volunteers should consider implementing human resource best practices by requiring a volunteer selection process. Such screening methods might test for volunteer success predictors such as reliability and dependability. Nonprofits may find that the most effective and efficient volunteer screening tools are application blanks and structured interviews. By focusing more on volunteer selection, nonprofits may be able to ensure that they are fostering a long term partnership with the highest quality potential volunteers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.B.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.