Comedic Timing: The Influence of the Atellanae Fabulae on Commedia Del'Arte

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243965
Title:
Comedic Timing: The Influence of the Atellanae Fabulae on Commedia Del'Arte
Author:
Hijazi, Jennifer Rose
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Atellan Farces of ancient Italy, also known as the Atellanae Fabulae, were short plays characterized by masked stock types in outlandish and humorous situations. The humor was low, bawdy, crude, and all done in commentary on the rough country life outside of Rome proper. Centuries later in Renaissance Italy, Commedia dell’Arte reaches the peak of its success in the sixteenth century. Commedia, likewise, features fixed characters in mask who gallivant around stages throughout Europe, amusing audiences with their exaggerated attributes and stories. Both genres are remarkably similar in style and execution, and yet many modern scholars believe the two are unconnected. Through the examination of literary and visual sources on the plays and a brief look into Structuralism, I seek to prove that Commedia Dell’Arte is indeed a byproduct of the Atellan Farces not only through their obvious similarities, but also through the lens of Structural Anthropology.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Classics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleComedic Timing: The Influence of the Atellanae Fabulae on Commedia Del'Arteen_US
dc.creatorHijazi, Jennifer Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorHijazi, Jennifer Roseen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Atellan Farces of ancient Italy, also known as the Atellanae Fabulae, were short plays characterized by masked stock types in outlandish and humorous situations. The humor was low, bawdy, crude, and all done in commentary on the rough country life outside of Rome proper. Centuries later in Renaissance Italy, Commedia dell’Arte reaches the peak of its success in the sixteenth century. Commedia, likewise, features fixed characters in mask who gallivant around stages throughout Europe, amusing audiences with their exaggerated attributes and stories. Both genres are remarkably similar in style and execution, and yet many modern scholars believe the two are unconnected. Through the examination of literary and visual sources on the plays and a brief look into Structuralism, I seek to prove that Commedia Dell’Arte is indeed a byproduct of the Atellan Farces not only through their obvious similarities, but also through the lens of Structural Anthropology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineClassicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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