Expanding the Visual Identity of Cord of Hope Ministry: Or, One Way Graphic Design Can Benefit the World

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243958
Title:
Expanding the Visual Identity of Cord of Hope Ministry: Or, One Way Graphic Design Can Benefit the World
Author:
Grover, Jenna Nicole
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One question has plagued me since the moment I entered into the Visual Communications program - does this degree have the power to improve the world? I doubted the power of graphic design because it was not seeking a cure for cancer, ending world hunger or pacifying war. I passionately love my field, but how could it be of any benefit? This question dogged my heels, nipping until I set out for an answer. I chose to expand the visual identity of a ministry called Cord of Hope, an organization within a Tucson church. Using their pre-existing logo, I designed business collateral, posters, newsletters and a website with the hope that their visual expansion would result in greater connections with the community they sought to serve. I was delightfully surprised at the results. The organization has blossomed and grown deeper into the heart of Tucson. It has connected with other ministries that are serving the city. Furthermore, the ministry has grown in its identity as a whole, resulting in confidence, security, and hope for what is to come. As for the question that previously nagged me, I answer it confidently with a “yes, design can indeed improve the world.”
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.F.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Visual Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExpanding the Visual Identity of Cord of Hope Ministry: Or, One Way Graphic Design Can Benefit the Worlden_US
dc.creatorGrover, Jenna Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrover, Jenna Nicoleen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne question has plagued me since the moment I entered into the Visual Communications program - does this degree have the power to improve the world? I doubted the power of graphic design because it was not seeking a cure for cancer, ending world hunger or pacifying war. I passionately love my field, but how could it be of any benefit? This question dogged my heels, nipping until I set out for an answer. I chose to expand the visual identity of a ministry called Cord of Hope, an organization within a Tucson church. Using their pre-existing logo, I designed business collateral, posters, newsletters and a website with the hope that their visual expansion would result in greater connections with the community they sought to serve. I was delightfully surprised at the results. The organization has blossomed and grown deeper into the heart of Tucson. It has connected with other ministries that are serving the city. Furthermore, the ministry has grown in its identity as a whole, resulting in confidence, security, and hope for what is to come. As for the question that previously nagged me, I answer it confidently with a “yes, design can indeed improve the world.”en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.F.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVisual Communicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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