Characterizing the Coagulopathy Associated with Resuscitation Following Cardian Arrest

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243956
Title:
Characterizing the Coagulopathy Associated with Resuscitation Following Cardian Arrest
Author:
Glenn, Thomas Michael, III
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
It appears that a Post-Resuscitation Injury (PRI) contributes to the poor recovery in patients following cardiac arrest. One component of PRI may be a hypercoagulable condition. The purpose of this study was to determine if blood coagulability is increased in our laboratory model early in recovery following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized and subjected to a cardiac arrest and resuscitation (A/R) protocol. During the study, arterial blood gases, heart rate, and blood pressure were monitored prior to cardiac arrest (PRE) and for two hours following resuscitation. Blood samples were taken at PRE, R60 and R120 to assess whole blood coagulability using thromboelastography (TEG). Twenty six A/R experiments were conducted. Five animals could not be resuscitated and two others did not survive the two hour recovery period. For the survivors, most (13/19) demonstrated a significant increase in coagulability (Coagulation Index, CI) during recovery. Surprisingly, the other survivors (6/19) demonstrated a hypocoagulable response during recovery in which marked intestinal hemorrhage, abdominal fluid accumulation, and hemodilution were often observed. It is believed that both the hypercoagulable and hypocoagulable responses may significantly complicate recovery in the early hours following successful resuscitation.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCharacterizing the Coagulopathy Associated with Resuscitation Following Cardian Arresten_US
dc.creatorGlenn, Thomas Michael, IIIen_US
dc.contributor.authorGlenn, Thomas Michael, IIIen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIt appears that a Post-Resuscitation Injury (PRI) contributes to the poor recovery in patients following cardiac arrest. One component of PRI may be a hypercoagulable condition. The purpose of this study was to determine if blood coagulability is increased in our laboratory model early in recovery following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized and subjected to a cardiac arrest and resuscitation (A/R) protocol. During the study, arterial blood gases, heart rate, and blood pressure were monitored prior to cardiac arrest (PRE) and for two hours following resuscitation. Blood samples were taken at PRE, R60 and R120 to assess whole blood coagulability using thromboelastography (TEG). Twenty six A/R experiments were conducted. Five animals could not be resuscitated and two others did not survive the two hour recovery period. For the survivors, most (13/19) demonstrated a significant increase in coagulability (Coagulation Index, CI) during recovery. Surprisingly, the other survivors (6/19) demonstrated a hypocoagulable response during recovery in which marked intestinal hemorrhage, abdominal fluid accumulation, and hemodilution were often observed. It is believed that both the hypercoagulable and hypocoagulable responses may significantly complicate recovery in the early hours following successful resuscitation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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