China's One-Child Policy and its Unintended Consquences on Chinese Society and Gender Ratio

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243912
Title:
China's One-Child Policy and its Unintended Consquences on Chinese Society and Gender Ratio
Author:
Cavanaugh, Julia Rose
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Since 1978, China’s One-Child Policy has been decreasing the nation’s population numbers to make way for China’s economic reform and modernization. Today, China boasts that with the help of this policy, the government has prevented over 300 million births. Though this has positively affected China’s economy in the short term, there is a myriad of consequences only beginning to manifest, including a highly imbalanced gender ratio, a progressively older population base, and a decrease in the work force numbers. If China hopes to lessen the fallout from these imminent situations and the consequences they carry, it needs to abandon the one-child policy and continue with social campaigns promoting the benefits of having daughters.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; International Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleChina's One-Child Policy and its Unintended Consquences on Chinese Society and Gender Ratioen_US
dc.creatorCavanaugh, Julia Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorCavanaugh, Julia Roseen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince 1978, China’s One-Child Policy has been decreasing the nation’s population numbers to make way for China’s economic reform and modernization. Today, China boasts that with the help of this policy, the government has prevented over 300 million births. Though this has positively affected China’s economy in the short term, there is a myriad of consequences only beginning to manifest, including a highly imbalanced gender ratio, a progressively older population base, and a decrease in the work force numbers. If China hopes to lessen the fallout from these imminent situations and the consequences they carry, it needs to abandon the one-child policy and continue with social campaigns promoting the benefits of having daughters.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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