Reclaiming the Female Body: Dissociating Reproduction from Confucian and Socialist Patriarchy in 1980's Chinese Women's Literature

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243899
Title:
Reclaiming the Female Body: Dissociating Reproduction from Confucian and Socialist Patriarchy in 1980's Chinese Women's Literature
Author:
Cai, Alice
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis examines Hu Xin’s "Four Women of Forty" and Lu Xing’er’s "The Sun is Not Out Today" as examples of efforts by 1980's women writers to dissociate traditionally "feminine" qualities of nurturing, love, and motherhood from patriarchal demands driven by revolutionary forces and traditional forces.. This dissociation is similar to one represented by Henrik Ibsen's character Nora, appropriated by May 4th writers in early 20th century China to encourage a realization of female individualism. Steering away from initial radical modes of writing, post-Mao literary trends urge for reconciliation of women with their biological roles. Some Western feminists believe emphasis on these roles trap women within traditional stereotypes. However, further analysis of 1980's Chinese women's literature reveals that the call for patriarchal overthrow continues within a context presenting solutions to the issue of balancing social responsibility and biology by achieving human status. This thesis is part of ongoing gender literature evaluation and will lead to a revised understanding of the goals of 1980's Chinese women’s writing within its social context.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; East Asian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleReclaiming the Female Body: Dissociating Reproduction from Confucian and Socialist Patriarchy in 1980's Chinese Women's Literatureen_US
dc.creatorCai, Aliceen_US
dc.contributor.authorCai, Aliceen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines Hu Xin’s "Four Women of Forty" and Lu Xing’er’s "The Sun is Not Out Today" as examples of efforts by 1980's women writers to dissociate traditionally "feminine" qualities of nurturing, love, and motherhood from patriarchal demands driven by revolutionary forces and traditional forces.. This dissociation is similar to one represented by Henrik Ibsen's character Nora, appropriated by May 4th writers in early 20th century China to encourage a realization of female individualism. Steering away from initial radical modes of writing, post-Mao literary trends urge for reconciliation of women with their biological roles. Some Western feminists believe emphasis on these roles trap women within traditional stereotypes. However, further analysis of 1980's Chinese women's literature reveals that the call for patriarchal overthrow continues within a context presenting solutions to the issue of balancing social responsibility and biology by achieving human status. This thesis is part of ongoing gender literature evaluation and will lead to a revised understanding of the goals of 1980's Chinese women’s writing within its social context.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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