Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243898
Title:
Calibration of a Sensate Bone Regeneration Scaffold
Author:
Brown, Chelsea Elise
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Long bone defects can cause complex challenges to both doctor and patient. Current clinical strategies for treating patients with long bone segment defects are very poor. Sensate implantable biomimetic polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) scaffolds develop faster and more complete bone ingrowth than simple porous scaffolds with the same pore size and overall porosity. They have provided the opportunity to monitor healing and could be used to study regeneration of bone in defects. Previous studies have successfully created small sensate scaffolds for canine femoral condylar resurfacing in the stifle joint (the knee). The shape and size of these scaffolds could be modified to act as bone supporting scaffolds for larger segment bone regeneration. Sensors on these scaffolds could be used to determine loading and detect healing as bone ingrowth occurred. A biomimetic scaffold was wired and loaded to 250 N. The stiffness of this porous segmental replacement scaffold was found to be lower than the modulus of the material. A sheep bone was wired and loaded with compression to 250 N, and with cantilever bending to 50 N. The stiffness was found to be similar to previously reported stiffness for sheepfemora. Limitations to the study include the irregular size, shape, and composition of the sheep bone, as well as differences in loading compared to a human bone.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCalibration of a Sensate Bone Regeneration Scaffolden_US
dc.creatorBrown, Chelsea Eliseen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Chelsea Eliseen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLong bone defects can cause complex challenges to both doctor and patient. Current clinical strategies for treating patients with long bone segment defects are very poor. Sensate implantable biomimetic polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) scaffolds develop faster and more complete bone ingrowth than simple porous scaffolds with the same pore size and overall porosity. They have provided the opportunity to monitor healing and could be used to study regeneration of bone in defects. Previous studies have successfully created small sensate scaffolds for canine femoral condylar resurfacing in the stifle joint (the knee). The shape and size of these scaffolds could be modified to act as bone supporting scaffolds for larger segment bone regeneration. Sensors on these scaffolds could be used to determine loading and detect healing as bone ingrowth occurred. A biomimetic scaffold was wired and loaded to 250 N. The stiffness of this porous segmental replacement scaffold was found to be lower than the modulus of the material. A sheep bone was wired and loaded with compression to 250 N, and with cantilever bending to 50 N. The stiffness was found to be similar to previously reported stiffness for sheepfemora. Limitations to the study include the irregular size, shape, and composition of the sheep bone, as well as differences in loading compared to a human bone.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.